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Off the subject: Terebentine Essence

tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,353
Hello

Would anyone know what terebentine essence is?  I was referred this mixed with linseed oil 50/50 to polish wooden furniture. 

I have translated it from French which is exactly the same words. I am none the wiser.  Has anybody on this site used this?

Thanks
Tui
A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

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Posts

  • floraliesfloralies Haute-Garonne SW FrancePosts: 1,412
    I think it's tupentine @tui34, not used it myself.
  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 1,044
    I wonder if @Obelixx may know as she does some furniture restoration I think ?
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 7,650
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,353
    OK thank you - then if that's turps, would you know what "White Spirit" is. (The French use this english term) for cleaning paintbrushes.  "Alcohol à Bruler" is Meths.  Hmmm.
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,353
    I had a look at your translation site @Pete.8 and it said it was oil of turpentine.  Maybe less refined than turps?  Anyway, it is a good furniture polish.  Thanks for that folks.
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 4,626
    Turpentine is made from tree resin, white spirit from petroleum distillates (so also from trees/plants ultimately - prehistoric ones). Google found me this https://www.thecreativefolk.com/white-spirit-vs-turpentine/
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,353
    Yes!  I saw that Terebentine (on a French site) was made from tree resin that's why I couldn't work it out so, it is indeed turps and White Spirit is, as you say from petroleum distillates.  That makes sense!  Thank you!  @JennyJ    
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,413
    edited 13 October
    I wouldn't use linseed oil to polish furniture as it's sticky.

    I do use equal parts methanol, turps/térébentine and white spirit to clean furniture I'm planning to restore or renovate.  It helps remove dirt and make surfaces easier to pre as well as feeding the wood.

    You need to do it in a well aired space, apply with a  lint free cloth or a brush or a pan scrub depending on the surface - cloth for smooth, brush for intricate carved bits and pan scrub for tight corners where one surface meets another- and the level of ingrained muck.  Leave it for a day then apply again and remove with a cloth.   Leave to dry then sand and either feed or oil it or prime it and paint it.

    When I want to feed furniture I use a mix of 1 lemon squeezed into a litre of cheap olive oil.  Shake well and apply with a cloth.  leave to soak in for a day then repeat it needed.  Wipe off any excess that hasn't soaked in.   leave at least a day before putting things on the surface.  It makes a good protection and the furniture glows quietly.  Can be dusted with a damp cloth and is much easier to renew than wax polish.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,353
    Thank you @Obelixx   Some great handy hints.  I suppose methanol is Alcool à Bruler?  You could get quite silly after an afternoon's work!!

    Olive oil, especially down here is widely used.  You can always have a swig.  

    Hope you are having some sunny weather up there.
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,413
    We are thanks.  Methanol is sold as Methanol in DIY stores and Leclerc here. It doesn't have to be extra virgin and the lady who gave me that tip said use the second pressing that's sold for cooking.  I can't always get that here so I use the cheapest EV olive oil.  It's also good for wooden handles on garden tools - after you've scrubbed off al the muck and let them dry.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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