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Hyacinth bulbs

debs64debs64 West Midlands, on the edge of the Black Country Posts: 3,778
Hi all, noticed my local Wilkinson has prepared hyacinth bulbs and fancied giving them a try so any advice please? Type of container? Soil? Any tips from you clever lot gratefully received 
thanks 

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 9,857
    Are you going to grow them indoors, or out?
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 6,450
    I've only ever grown indoor ones that were given to me as a present. They were already potted up in bulb fibre with only the bottom half the bulb in the fibre. The top halves were sticking out of the fibre. I seem to remember my mum doing a similar thing.

    Once the bulbs finished flowering I put them in the garden (planted quite deeply because they're large bulbs) where they've flowered happily for years - one of the few bulbs I can grow in my heavy clay soil and which the squirrels don't excavate.

    If you're thinking about them as indoor bulbs be warned the perfume is very strong - a bit like jasmine or lilies. I don't mind but not everyone likes it.
    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • debs64debs64 West Midlands, on the edge of the Black Country Posts: 3,778
    Sorry, I mean to grow them indoors and I love the smell. Do you have to keep them in the dark or something? 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 72,612
    Yes … plant them in moist bulb fibre or MPC. Two thirds in the compost, top third sticking out. Put them somewhere cool and dark (the coal cellar was the ideal, when folk had them). 
    Keep the compost moist but not wet. 
    Keep them there until they have pale shoots growing and you can see the flower buds. 
    When the flower buds are out of the bulb move them into the light but still keep them cool. 
    Then when the shoots and buds are about 3-4” tall move onto  your living room windowsill where it’s light but warmer. The flowers will colour and open soon and fill your home with scent. 
    😊 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • debs64debs64 West Midlands, on the edge of the Black Country Posts: 3,778
    Thanks @Dovefromabove I will plant some up this weekend I know some people dislike the smell, my mother hated them also lilies but I love it so will give it a go. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 40,583
    I'm with your mum on this one @debs64but lots of folk love them- they're popular at this time of year so that they have them in flower around Christmas.
    It's just a question of 'tricking' them into their growth at a different time, as @Dovefromabove and @Topbird describe. Then you can plant out once they're done.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 72,612
    We always had them in the house each Christmas … planting prepared bulbs in the first week of September should give blooms at Christmas. Yours will be later but just as lovely. 

    At our little village school planting prepared hyacinth bulbs was one of the first tasks of the autumn term so each of us could give our parents a pot of bulbs ready to bloom on the last day of term. 

    I think the bulbs and fibre and cheap plastic bowls were paid for by the school governors each year.  It was a tiny school … under 20 children. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 4,576
    I haven't grown them in years but when I did, I used to aim to have them flowering sometime between mid-January and mid-February - something nice to brighten up the house after the Christmas decorations have been taken down.
  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 6,450
    It's strange isn't it @Fairygirl? I really rather like the scent of lilies in the house but find jasmine and hyacinths a bit too much. 

    However, I love the hyacinths in a border outside. Not only are they a welcome splash of colour but gardening on a warm spring day when you get a whiff of scent whilst working and it takes a few moments to work out the source. All part of the delicious harbinger of warm summer days to come. 
    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 40,583
    I used to love lilies, but now can't bear them - inside or outside. The longiflorum ones are fine though. 
    I don't even have a very good sense of smell, so I don't know what the reason is.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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