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Trying to create interest

DelsieDelsie Posts: 21
What can I plant in Oct/Nov to provide interesting contrast to a yellow flowering cinquefoil? Thanks. 😁
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  • DelsieDelsie Posts: 21
    I'm thinking hardy and low maintenance. 
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 15,438
    Aconitum? Tall, purply blue.  It looks good at the side of yellow heleniums at the moment.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,327
    What else do you have planted nearby, how much room is there, do you want something vertical, as with @fidgetbones' suggestion, or something lower growing? Colour preferences? Flowering now or in summer?

    Almost any hardy geranium would do. Other verticals like Heleniums which have strong, orangey colours will flower at the same sort of time, or Crocosmia if you like those colours. Schizostylis, now called Hesperantha, comes in a white variety, and flowers at this time of year. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Balgay.HillBalgay.Hill Posts: 338
    One of the blue Asters?
    Sunny Dundee
  • DelsieDelsie Posts: 21
    Fairygirl said:
    What else do you have planted nearby, how much room is there, do you want something vertical, as with @fidgetbones' suggestion, or something lower growing? Colour preferences? Flowering now or in summer?

    Almost any hardy geranium would do. Other verticals like Heleniums which have strong, orangey colours will flower at the same sort of time, or Crocosmia if you like those colours. Schizostylis, now called Hesperantha, comes in a white variety, and flowers at this time of year. 
    Nothing much nearby, I'm kind of starting from scratch. I like the idea of something vertical that has a long summer flowering period. 
  • didywdidyw East SuffolkPosts: 1,017
    I'll second the blue asters.  I have had Aster frikartii 'Monch' in flower for ages and it is still going strong.  I have it near my front gate so love to see it every time I go in or out and I can also see it from my bedroom window.
  • DelsieDelsie Posts: 21
    didyw said:
    I'll second the blue asters.  I have had Aster frikartii 'Monch' in flower for ages and it is still going strong.  I have it near my front gate so love to see it every time I go in or out and I can also see it from my bedroom window.
    These look pretty, but this site says I should plant in spring rather than autumn. 
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,115
    You're after something that will flower alongside your yellow cinquefoil in summer, but you want to plant it in Oct/Nov? I think a few people assumed you meant you wanted something that *flowered* in Oct/Nov. 

    You can plant most things in Oct/Nov, although if it's a herbaceous perennial you won't see anything of it during the winter. (And you may struggle to find stock at the garden centre that late).

    Something vertical with a long summer flowering period that complements yellow cinquefoil.... has to be Verbena bonariensis! Prefers sun and reasonably well drained soil. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,327
    edited 11 October
    You need to look at what conditions and aspect you're growing in @Delsie . Potentillas will grow in almost any conditions, so we're guessing here with suggestions. Asters and V. bon would be great plants, and so would Agastaches and Lychnis and many others, but they like sun, while lots of other suitable plants don't, and may actively need shade. Campanulas, Japanese anemones, Polemonium and Aconitum  would suit you, if the Potentilla is in a shadier spot. The amount of room you have is also a factor  :)

    Anything can be planted now, as @Loxley said, if it's in a pot, and it's a good sized plant [not a tiny cutting or something in a 3 inch pot, or similar] and you have the right site and conditions for it.
    Spring is often suggested, because ground is usually warming up, and plants are coming into growth, but it can be misleading. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DelsieDelsie Posts: 21
    Thanks for the suggestions. I think the soil is loam, as it seems to welcome anything and drains well. The garden gets a lot of sun throughout the day.

    I tried uploading a picture of the soil, but apparently the file is too large. 
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