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What is this bulb? And plant?

Hi. I have just been doing some hand raking in the garden and whilst doing it I raked up these bulbs that are pretty close to the green plant (see both photos).

Does anyone know what they are? And are they likely to be one and the same thing?

I am actually sowing some British woodland flower seeds at the moment in a shadier part of the garden. So wondering if I should take out these bulbs or leave them in. If they do flower i might leave them and sow around . . .

Thanks.

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Posts

  • PerkiPerki Rossendale - LancashirePosts: 2,182
    They look like blue bells bulbs. And the other is one of the saxifrage family. 
  • Perki said:
    They look like blue bells bulbs. And the other is one of the saxifrage family. 

    If they are bluebells then I will put them back in (it is in a shadier part of the garden - so would match with where bluebells would grow - according to an internet search).

    The other plant though. Not too sure about that. I wonder if there is any benefit to leaving it in.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,106
    The saxifrage looks like London Pride or something similar. If that's what it is, it's useful because it will grow and cover the ground in dry shade.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,422
    edited October 2021
    I think the Saxifrage looks like Saxifraga x urbium “London Pride”. A lovely old fashioned garden plant not often seen nowadays, but apparently it’s becoming very fashionable again and is quite sought after as not many garden centres stock it. 

    I think it’s a lovely plant. 😊 

    Picture and more info here https://www.rhsplants.co.uk/plants/_/saxifraga--urbium/classid.2000028607/

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,798
    edited October 2021
    London Pride is a wonderful plant imo; I have lots of it. It likes partial shade, is evergreen, will spread happily to provide ground cover but bits are very easy to remove if you don't want them, the flowers are gorgeous, requires no care (unless you put them in full sun, which they hate) and, to me, means 'home'.


    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,912
    Another one here loves London Pride, ours has travelled the country wherever we moved to. It now rests in Devon,   Good ground cover and good for early bees. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 1,156
    My first thoughts are Bluebells and London Pride as well.
    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • I take it the London Pride isn´t very deep rooted? As when hand raking the soil I noticed that I seem to have pulled out a long rooted one of the same plant.
    I´m now wondering if I can just stick it back in.

  • skankinpickleskankinpickle Posts: 14
    edited October 2021
    I think the Saxifrage looks like Saxifraga x urbium “London Pride”. A lovely old fashioned garden plant not often seen nowadays, but apparently it’s becoming very fashionable again and is quite sought after as not many garden centres stock it. 

    I think it’s a lovely plant. 😊 

    Picture and more info here https://www.rhsplants.co.uk/plants/_/saxifraga--urbium/classid.2000028607/


    It could well have been here since the original owners (early 1960s) :o
  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 656

    The dwarf form of this saxifrage grows well here in full sun, and is smothered in a froth of pink flowers.
    I leave the stems on after flowering is over as they turn a rather nice deep rusty red. I also have it in partial shade.


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