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Acer plants/trees/bushes

Hi everyone, I bought 3 different types of Acers this year & are currently in pots as we're re-designing our garden next year & didn't want to plant then disturb them. My question is can they tolerate winter in pots or should I cover them in the garden fleece jackets? Or pop them inside my greenhouse for shelter. 
Thank you
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  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,817
    Depends on the size and maturity and where you live.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Doghouse RileyDoghouse Riley Posts: 347
    edited October 2021
    Here in South Manchester we have  two acer palmatums, they started life as not much more than a foot tall, this one we've had for thirty five years




    and this one for fifteen,




    They get "haircuts" in the winter to stop them getting too big.

    They've never been anywhere other than where they are and we never cover them.

    However, we bought an acer palmatum Taylor last year which we kept on our sheltered patio in a  ceramic pot. It didn't survive the winter.




    A lot of acers now are grafted and they are an obvious graft.  I  don't know if this affects their survival rate. Our original ones weren't grafted.

    I bought two new ones this year, one I planted out the other is in a pot, I'll put it on the window sill of the shed in the winter.


  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,817
    Where you live and the size and maturity of the plants is very relevant, as well as the siting of the plant.
    Those tiny little plants they sell in supermarkets wouldn't last long here, never mind anywhere much colder and wetter, without some shelter. A large, mature specimen from a good supplier is entirely different.
    The variety also matters.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Fairygirl said:
    Depends on the size and maturity and where you live.  :)
    We live in North Yorkshire, & reading the comments, I think I'll pop them into my greenhouse & keep an eye on them. Thanks  😊
  • thevictorianthevictorian Posts: 1,253
    Completely agree with Fairygirl. Acer is a large family with some being unbelievably hardy and others not so much. Size definitely plays a roll in how hardy they are as well as mature plants have more substance to survive a harsh winter.
    The wet often kills small acers and this is why keeping small specimens in a sheltered space where they won't get to wet is a good idea but it very much depends on which acers you actually have. 
  • Here in South Manchester we have  two acer palmatums, this one for thirty five years




    and this one for fifteen,




    They get "haircuts" in the winter to stop them getting too big.

    They've never been anywhere other than where they are and we never cover them.

    However, we bought an acer palmatum Taylor last year which we kept on our sheltered patio in a  ceramic pot. It didn't survive the winter.




    A lot of acers now are grafted and they are an obvious graft.  I  don't know if this affects their survival rate. Our original ones weren't grafted.

    I bought two new ones this year, one I planted out the other is in a pot, I'll put it on the window sill of the shed in the winter.


    Yes mine are like the one on your patio, I think I'll pop mine in the greenhouse & keep an eye on them. Thanks 😊
  • The main thing for most pot plants,  is not letting the root rootball  freeze. Many part of Japan still have very cold winters, and their Acers survive.
    AB Still learning

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 8,717
    Mine stay outside,only one in the bed,the rest in pots but very mild and sheltered where I live. 
  • This might be of interest for those with young acers.

    Ours are completely symetrical. They don't always grow like that in nature. sometimes they're a bit lop-sided.

    It's a question of training them.

    I placed a number of canes in a circle around them. connected by strong garden wire.
     Branches that were  growing in the wrong direction,  I connected  to the circlular wire by more wire, gently pulling them way I wanted them to grow, then a couple of months later moved them a bit more and so on. You can't rush it, they'll break.
    "Uncooperative" branches got removed.

    This was back in 2007.




  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,817
    Well, it's only relevant if you want everything looking like a lollipop.
    Many of us don't  :)

    Acers are extremely hardy @Allotment Boy , but many factors have an effect on them, especially small ones, and especially the green/yellow ones, and the dissectums. Wind in particular causes a lot of problems. As you say - wet then freezing, repeated, is also one of the main  areas of concern, if the plants are small. Having them in amongst other shrubs is a good way of overwintering them.  :)
    Without knowing exactly what the OP has it's difficult to advise, but certainly, a bit of basic protection over winter is sensible, as long as they aren't in humid conditions, with poor airflow. Our climate here is perfect for them  :)  
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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