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Hydrangea Seemanii - pruning issue!

Hello 

I planted this lovely evergreen climber in a spot near my front door to clamber up the wall. It's about 2 feet high and has about ten shoots climbing upwards and a few growing laterally along the paving. Should I leave this young plant to do its own thing, or would you advise cutting back the side shoots? I was advised by a chap in a garden centre not to touch it for a while and only cut back the shoots if really necessary.

Any advice gratefully received!

Posts

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Posts: 37,734
    Hello Diane and welcome to the forum. I have a H. seemanii on my garage wall. Its been there for two years and I haven't had cause to do any pruning at all as yet. If it starts to push its way under the garage roof then I will do some judicious pruning. If you are a little concerned about the lateral shoots growing along the paving would it be possible to peg these down into the soil to deter them from growing over the paving?
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    If it's only that size, it's a very immature plant, so just needs time. They need a bit of help to 'attach' until they self cling.
    I hope you have plenty of room for it  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Thanks both for the advice. The plant is growing on the wall between the bay window and door - about a three feet wide space. It's planted in a spot where the paving has been removed so there is not much more soil either side. It has to grow up vertically really and can then grow horizontally over the top of the bay. I have seen hydrangeas covering house walls  looking quite glorious. The wall doesn't get much sun. It seems to love the spot and is growing quickly. 
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Posts: 37,734
    The situation is ideal for the plant Diane. If you think that the lateral shoots are going to be a bit of a problem then you could remove them as, from your description, there seem to be plenty of upward growing shoots. Alternatively you could try loosely fastening the lateral shoots to the verticals. As Fairy girl says, they do need a bit of time to start self clinging. Mine seemed as if the shoots were never going to 'attach' but eventually they did. Now I am waiting for the first flowers.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • That's very good advice Ladybird4. I may attach them to other shoots so they grow vertically as you suggest. The less I tamper with it the better I think. Good luck with your plant coming into flower. I have read that it takes years. For now I'll make do with the glossy, evergreen foliage!
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Posts: 37,734

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    All the climbing hydrangeas take many years to establish and get going, but once they do, they're stunning.
    You could even use a few runs of horizontal wires on vine eyes to get those other shoots tied in and heading the right way. 
    Good luck with it.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • I had thought of that. Good idea! 

    Thanks once again 😊
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    You'll need to keep an eye on it once it gets going because the space it's planted in is very narrow. You'll need some secateurs  ;)
    The wires would be virtually invisible quite quickly too, so it's worth considering before it gets too big to get in behind it to do them.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • It's got a good 6 feet to climb up before being trained iaterally, but sensible to get the framework there in advance.
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