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Stone Border - Improving Drainage?

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  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,036
    For water to flow over the surface into the drain, the turf would have to be completely saturated with standing water, which defeats the purpose of having the drain. 
  • Fair enough. It probably is at it's worst but hoping to not let it get that bad anymore! As you say, defeating the purpose.

    My main worry about the drainage at the front is that if it's just stones in there, it isn't going to take much for a stone to move and plug the hole, since it'll just be the size of a drill bit. Feel like it's more sure if I can create a space to protect the drainage holes. 

    I think it'll be quite difficult to dig all the way down to the level of the stones by the bin. I think there's a lot of rubbish underneath. I dug another area at the front recently and hit a layer of solid rubble pretty quick. 
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,036
    Normally weepholes would be much bigger than a normal drill bit. 20mm diameter or more. But if you can prop up the bottom gravel board with stones etc leaving gaps the water will find it's way out through there:



    If you don't fancy digging down that far you could create a gap inbetween the gravel boards; lift up and place something in there that will create a gap (say 5mm) all the way along:   



    To be honest there are probably enough gaps between the gravel boards for the water to get out already. You want the water to escape at the lowest point possible. And there's no point digging your trench lower than the point at which the water escapes.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 50,133
    As @Loxley says - the membrane you use depends on what you want to achieve. A solid liner that I was suggesting would act more like a pipe which would physically remove water to another place. I may have misunderstood what you were trying to do, so I'm glad it's all been clarified, and Loxley has given you great illustrations and further info.
    The French drains, as I mentioned earlier, are definitely the answer but I thought you were simply wanting to channel the water from the gravelled areas at the sides down to the front, and you weren't too bothered about the grass.  :)
    I think the people doing your new work will be able to sort that gravel board area, including the bit on the right of the steps,  if they're going to be in there to do the hot tub/base and patio. Surely they'll have to remove all that to get in? 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Fairygirl said:
    As @Loxley says - the membrane you use depends on what you want to achieve. A solid liner that I was suggesting would act more like a pipe which would physically remove water to another place. I may have misunderstood what you were trying to do, so I'm glad it's all been clarified, and Loxley has given you great illustrations and further info.
    The French drains, as I mentioned earlier, are definitely the answer but I thought you were simply wanting to channel the water from the gravelled areas at the sides down to the front, and you weren't too bothered about the grass.  :)
    I think the people doing your new work will be able to sort that gravel board area, including the bit on the right of the steps,  if they're going to be in there to do the hot tub/base and patio. Surely they'll have to remove all that to get in? 
    So I thought of this late last night, but the gravel board actually goes under the fence and continues into next garden, so essentially it is shared, so lifting it and propping it up would put it on an angle.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 50,133
    You'd need holes drilled through then.
    How are the areas going to be changed for your patio/hot tub base then? Or are the gravelled edges going to be wide enough that the men won't need to go near the retaining wall?

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • I'm guessing the lawn is on clay. Do you know how thick it is?
    If you have granular or free draining strata under the clay you may have other drainage options?
    Also..and I'm sure you're aware but after patio & drainage works your lawn will, in all likelihood, turn to a quagmire. ..you'd be surprised how many are surprised that construction works create mess.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 50,133
    Indeed @Chris-P-Bacon, although I was quite lucky this time with the extension. The guys were very good generally, but the grass took a wee bit of time to recover from all the stuff lying on it for a month. It could have been much worse though, if I hadn't created it with loads of drainage to start with    ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,036
    It sounds like he's installing a freestanding hot tub on a concrete base, and a patio. Either way he won't regret avoiding doing the work in wet weather and/or putting down some plywood boards to protect the lawn during the works!
  • Jac19Jac19 Posts: 496
    Dig a deep trench across, going as deep as you can manage, near the patio but not right next to it, and fill it with a lot of grit, some soil.  Then put a manure plus soil layer on top for growing things on it.  The water will drain into it and drain deeper underground.  

    Some work suggested above for draining to the side will also help.
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