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Bulb lasagna

Hi all,

I saw this article about making a bulb lasagna. I thought it was a great idea for xmas gifts! (the recipients will need to practice a little delayed gratification).

My question is, should I buy all the bulbs/pots now and plant them-up ready to give at Christmas; or should I wait and plant them just before I give them; or does it not make any difference?

Has anyone else done a bulb lasagna? Any good combinations?

(Im going to try 3 layers of bulbs!)
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Posts

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 8,717
    I did it several years ago, thought it was a brilliant idea. One lot of bulbs dying down while another lot came into flower. In reality,I found bulbs flowered at different times,(the same bulbs I mean) you had horrible scrappy windblown folliage with barely visible new bulbs coming out. I gave it up as a bad job. Now have just one variety of bulbs in a pot,and plant the surface with pansies, wallflowers
  • RubyRossRubyRoss Posts: 124
    I would plant them now. I tried it last year with tulips, narcissus Erlicheer, crocus, fritillaria, and violas on top. The winter violas made a big difference because they kept their colour throughout. But there were too many bulbs so the pot kept drying out and the flowers didn't last that long. It did get scraggly after the daffodils, but I moved it out of sight at that point. Trying it again this year with less bulbs.


  • Loraine3Loraine3 Posts: 579
    I plant these most years and also keep them to flower in later years. I use, tulips in the bottom then narcissus (Thalia) and crocus or anemone blanda on top. Some larger pots I also put the little cyclamen in for earlier flowers.
  • Thanks guys. 

    How many bulbs are you putting in the pot? I assumed more the merrier, but it looks like thats not the case. The 'rule of thumb' is to plant them 1 and half times their width apart. Would you say that about right?

    cyclamen look nice. Perhaps Ill put those in too!
  • edhelkaedhelka Posts: 2,350
    They look best when done in big pots, and these can be heavy - something to consider if you want to use them as gifts. Even more, if you want to do three layers and have a decent number of bulbs for every layer.
  • borgadrborgadr Posts: 709
    I tried it last year, a number of different combinations in big pots. Like @Nanny Beach , I found they got messy, especially the ones that flowered in succession.

    The one exception, which I will do again this year, was a combination of Narcissus Sunlight Sensation with Tulip Dutch Dancer (they flowered together and looked amazing).
  • edhelka said:
    They look best when done in big pots, and these can be heavy - something to consider if you want to use them as gifts. Even more, if you want to do three layers and have a decent number of bulbs for every layer.

    I was going to buy plastic pots (some look quite nice) so hopefully not that heavy.

    30 cms deep should suffice(?)
  • Loraine3Loraine3 Posts: 579
    Yes, 30 cms should be fine. I put a layer of tulips in the bottom, fairly close together but not touching, then narcissus again close but not touching and finish off with small bulbs on top, then the cyclamen.
  • JessicaSJessicaS Posts: 865
    I normally lasagne my wooden planters, narcissus, tulips and hyacinth, then cover the top with some pansy / viola and primroses for winter colour. I put tete a tete in my winter hanging baskets last year too which looked lovely.

  • Argh! Ive just got back from garden centre with all my pots and bulbs, and just realised the compost I bought is ericaceous!!  :(
    Can I chance it or shall I go back and get normal compost?
    Thanks
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