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Aster

I wonder why my asters look great from the top but they look brown and burnt underneath. Should they be split? All advice appreciated  

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  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    They can get mildew, which often manifests itself that way, but it's also fairly normal for Asters to look a bit scruffy. Growing some other plants in front of them helps too. 
    You can certainly divide them every few years to keep them healthy. Most perennials need that to keep them fresh.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • punkdocpunkdoc Posts: 14,937
    Agree, most Asters tend to have bare stems, so are best planted behind other plants.
    How can you lie there and think of England
    When you don't even know who's in the team

    S.Yorkshire/Derbyshire border
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,681
    If it's a bit 'frazzled', being in a less hot and dry spot will help. Is it a dwarf variety? It seems very small. Aster novae-angliae types are much less susceptible to mildew although also have unsightly 'bottoms' that are best screened by other plants.
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
  • Thank you everybody. I understand now. I will install some shorter plants in front of them. I don’t know which ones yet. Any ideas?
    Thank you again
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    Hardy geraniums are always a good shout @MartineB, as they can cope with almost any conditions, but  there are hundreds of types to choose from, so if you decide on those, have a look in Gcs /nurseries or at the many good online specialists.
    I have early stuff in front of mine, Pulsatillas etc for spring, because mine are in a raised bed, and I allow them to flop a bit over the edge. You could try dianthus if the soil suits, salvias, helianthemums, stachys, veronicas - that kind of thing. All sun lovers, and enjoy good drainage. Bulbs in spring are always useful for underplanting too.
    If you wanted something evergreen, euphorbias and some of the shorter grasses. Carexes [strictly speaking they're sedges] are good, and although they prefer moisture, they're actually quite drought resistant once established. Uncinias are also very good, and Libertias   :)
    Take a look at some of the top perennial suppliers for good ideas Hardy's Plants 
    and Claire Austin are just two of a  huge range. 

    https://www.hardysplants.co.uk/perennials

    https://claireaustin-hardyplants.co.uk/t/plants/perennials
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • PosyPosy Posts: 3,601
    You get less mildew if you can keep them well watered in dry weather. They seem to survive alright but it's not attractive.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    Yes mine don't get bothered by it here @Posy , but if they're in a very dry, open, sunny spot, it's certainly much harder to keep them looking good. 
    Watering in at the base is always better too.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    I took a pic just to show how mine falls over the edge of the bed. Slightly more than usual because of the weather in the last few days, but you get the idea. The bulk of it has a support in place. The bed is around 15" high at that point


    I should take that cane out - not sure why it's there!
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Thank you all. I can now see where I have gone wrong. I will water more as it is in a very sunny spot and also put other plants in front of my asters like hardy geraniums (my favourites). Those will have to be quite compact as it is in a very narrow bed.
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