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hebes just arrived, plant now?

morning all

ive just had 3 hebes arrive in the post and im wondering about whether i plant these now with the weather as it is and winter on the way or i was until spring when things are warming up, what do you think?

for reference this is the the one

https://www.jparkers.co.uk/hebe-heartbreaker-0003373c

thanks

mark

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    Hi @anonnymouse15 - if they're just tiny wee things, then no, pot them up, keep them somewhere sheltered [just out of extreme weather]  and grow them on for planting next year.  :)
    If they're of a reasonable enough size [a 3 to 4 inch pot with the roots filling that] and you have warmer conditions where you live, you could plant them out.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,016
    It mostly depends on their size but either way, check first to see if they are pot bound - roots tightly crammed and going round and round the pot.

    If they are small plants - less than 6"/15cm pot - then I would pot them on and let them grow somewhere sunny but sheltered so their roots can grow bigger and stronger before facing life in the borders.  If they are bigger and pot bound I would also pot them on - give them a good soak first then gently tease out the roots at the edges so they are encouraged to grow out to seek moisture and nutrients.   

    In either case use a good, loam based John Innes no 3 type compost and water well before and after.

    If they're bigger than 6" pots and not pot bound, then soak the roots, tease them out anyway and plant in well prepared soil - clear of weeds and grass and with some soil improver such as well-rotted manure or garden compost worked in.  Make sure they are at the same level as in the pot and are well watered after planting.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • hi @Obelixx and @Fairygirl thank you for your replies they are around 9-10cm, i live in the midlands, uk.

    its looking like 12-15 degrees over the next 2 weeks with rain. i was concerned they wouldnt have the warmth to get established before winter comes. i will check the roots and go from there, i might pot them on and keep in the garage over winter when the cold weather comes.
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,016
    If you pot them up now and keep them in a sunny spot out of the winds the roots'll grow on quite a bit between now and the end of November and then they can be planted out if you are in a mild area or else kept in a sheltered corner.   They'll need light so maybe the garage is not a good idea.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    I wouldn't put them in a garage either. Against a house wall or similar, or even in among other shrubs, as long as they get enough light.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,449
    I agree with all of the above, but the RHS shows that particular Hebe as hardiness H3, hardy in coastal and relatively mild parts of the UK, minimum temperature in the range 1 to -5 degrees C, so when winter comes, if there's a particularly cold night forecast (sub-zero) you could pop them in the garage overnight (if you have time for shuffling them in and out) or give them a bit of extra protection in their sheltered spot outside by throwing some horticultural fleece over them if you have it, or something like old net/voile curtains or sheets of newspaper.


    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    Good point @JennyJ. I should have checked that, as many Hebes aren't brilliant re hardiness anyway. Something I'm often saying when people on the forum say 'just cut them back and they'll be fine'. 
    Variegated ones are always more iffy too, and that one looks very variegated  ;)

    A porch is perfect if you have one, or even just a windowsill in a cool room. Depends on winter temps and conditions for your  location @anonnymouse15, but fleece or similar will work well, as Jenny says   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Variagated forms of Hebe can be iffy.  I would take cuttings should this winter kill your plant.  Hebes are so easy to grow I always back up my many hebes.  The hardiest in my view are "Autumn Glory" and "Purple Queen". Also "Hebe Variagated" is easy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    edited October 2021
    It also depends on location @lona43xlVxq3Fd, which I frequently say on the forum, but unfortunately, there are some who simply don't believe it! Local climates and conditions make a massive difference to the hardiness of many plants, as well as where they're positioned. Dry cold is always easier for plants to withstand than wet cold.  :)
    The size of the foliage is also a factor, and can often give a clue as to the hardiness levels, but the variegated forms are always less tough - as with many plants.
    I've grown A. Glory - and also lost it in harsh winters.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • AthelasAthelas Posts: 939
    edited October 2021
    Hi @anonnymouse15, just wanted to share my experience of Heartbreaker. I got two plants in 2 litre pots (17 cm diameter) in February 2018 and planted them in the ground — looking back it probably wasn’t a good time to do that. The winter was particularly cold (Beast from the East etc.) plus I have heavy clay soil and my garden has a challenging sun-in-summer/shade-in-winter aspect. They never thrived and I dug them up in April to put them back in their pots and give them a bit more shelter; despite the tiny new leaves you can see in the photo they eventually died. 

    I’ve found hebe ‘Caledonia’ and ‘Mrs Winder’ to be hardier — have had them for 4 years now — although their colouring is of course more dull than the Magic series (‘Heartbreaker’, ‘Magic Summer’, ‘Frozen Flame’, ‘Wild Romance’).

    Anyway I hope yours will do well with the advice on here; cuttings as insurance might be a good idea as Iona mentioned.


    Cambridgeshire, UK
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