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when to pick chillies on outdoor chilly plants

I have 3 chilly plants outdoors with lots of green chillies on. Shall I pick them now as it's getting very cold?
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,083
    If you can bring them indoors somewhere warm they may well still ripen.
    If not - then it's probably best to pick in the not too distant future as with current temps, they're not going to grow anymore and may start rotting.
    They freeze well, but are a bit mushy when defrosted.
    A friend makes a paste with them, puts it in a freezer bag then flattens it out before freezing. Just snap a bit off when needed
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Has anyone over wintered chilli plants?
    We have bought 4 plants into our garden room (instead of the polytunnel) to see if they will keep going.
    They are still producing flowers but of course no pollinators (unless we do).
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,496
    There are a few threads on overwintering chilli plants somewhere. I think the big problem is usually whitefly. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,198
    Apologies @sally smith, but it made me smile reading your thread title - 'on outdoor chilly plants'. 
    I expect they are a bit chilly!

    Good advice from @Pete.8 though. Hope they ripen well for you. It's the same with tomatoes. When the temps aren't good enough, you can finish ripening indoors  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I have had same problem.with white fly when bringing chillie plants indoors ..is there anything organic one can do to counteract this ?
    What happens if chillies plants are left outside during winter will they just simply die ? 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,083
    If the plant isn't too big, fill a bucket with water and just a few (about 6) drops of washing up liquid and stir - turn the plant upside down (ensuring it stays in its pot) and dunk a few times, that should shift them.
    Alternatively, use a hand sprayer with water and a few drops of washing up liquid and spray them off
    It's too cold outside now for chillies, they'll stop growing and die
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Thankyou 
  • Apparently you can overwinter chilli plants by cutting them right down to the lowest leaf node, putting them to one side in a greenhouse and doing your best to keep the wet away from them. I cannot verify this method, but I will be trying it this year (albeit in a cold frame).
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,083
    Apparently you can overwinter chilli plants by cutting them right down to the lowest leaf node, putting them to one side in a greenhouse and doing your best to keep the wet away from them. I cannot verify this method, but I will be trying it this year (albeit in a cold frame).
     I wish you luck, but when temps get down to something like 5c for a period of time they'll likely die and just a hint of frost will kill them.
    If you have a spare un-heated bedroom, they'll probably get through winter if they're cut back as you suggest and you keep the compost almost dry. A friend often does this. I can recall a couple of times he' said it's worked, but more often than not the plants don't revive very well
    Welcome to the forum btw :)
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • EustaceEustace OxfordPosts: 1,126
    I have overwintered chilli plants indoors. But I have had more fruiting with plants grown in the spring rather than the overwintered ones.
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