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Loads of cat droppings in large area of recently dug up, dry, a bit sandy soil

Pink678Pink678 EnglandPosts: 131
Over the past weeks I have been digging through an area of flowerbed where I find bindweed coming up, in an effort to pull up the vines from underneath.

I have now discovered what looks like a weeks worth of cat droppings in this area, so some local cat obviously thinks it's the new feline convenience area.

The soil is very loose, dry, a bit sandy, can be dug deeply and easily with paws - perfect for them.

What can I do to stop this?  It's these recently dug up areas that they love. But I can't see it going back to hard compacted soil any time soon. I have a cat repellant spray with orange oil, but it doesn't seem to do much. Is this bad for spraying on soil if I want to grow plants in it?

I was wondering is there is some kind of woodchip mix I could put down, or an aromatic kind of bark chippings that they won't like?  I don't have pets of my own.

Picture of the area:

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Posts

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,656
    The only methods that seem to work for me are plastic rigid netting pegged down or held down with bricks over the whole area or the RSPB sonic cat deterrent.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,503
    edited September 2021
    The same thing can happen to my newly sown rows of vegetables. 🤢
    I have rolls of wire netting that I spread out and pin down over such areas which keeps them off … sitting quietly with a pump action water pistol and not being afraid to use it helps. 
    We don’t have cats … our neighbours do, hence the problem 🙄 
    They know we will chase them from our garden, but they also know we absolutely will not hurt them. Just establish the territory as ours, not theirs. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Lizzie27 said:
    The only methods that seem to work for me are plastic rigid netting pegged down or held down with bricks over the whole area or the RSPB sonic cat deterrent.
    Determined cats will just crap on top of the netting which doubles your problem.
    Looking at all the threads on this Forum regarding the problem, the best deterrent would seem to be a Water Scarecrow if that is feasible for your situation.
    The various repellent sprays, citrus peel, lion dung are really just an expensive waste of time and money.  Apart from anything else, the rain negates any slight temporary effect they may have.
  • Pink678Pink678 EnglandPosts: 131
    I found this plastic netting, but it looks quite soft. And i have bricks. For today, shall I try that netting, or would a black plastic sack held down by bricks be better?


  • Pink678Pink678 EnglandPosts: 131
    Lizzie, is your firmer netting available at garden stores?
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,503
    edited September 2021
    I should’ve explained that I don’t flatten the netting, but allow it to retain a bit of its curve from being rolled. The cats can’t walk on it like that. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Pink678Pink678 EnglandPosts: 131
    DovefromAbove, is the "Blooma Galvanised Steel Triple torsion mesh" or "Blooma Green PVC-coated Steel Triple torsion mesh" from B&Q the kind of thing you use? (I don't think I can post links)

    Do you have any recommendations for a good water pistol - I found Nerf Super Soaker Fortnite on amazon?  I might get one and bill it to the house where the cat lives, as I think I know which cat it is and I know where he lives! (joke).
  • I think @Fairygirl may be able to recommend one ?  As in most things of this sort, there are good and bad :)
  • What a nightmare they can be. We have done most of what others have said and still....
    Always when we have a new area we do put netting down but wire netting and this has helped.
  • Pink678Pink678 EnglandPosts: 131
    Thank you philippa for your suggestions too! These cat droppings are quite a problem. If only cats would go in their own gardens.
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