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pond cleaning

I have a very small pond that I made from an old crock water trough, it has less than a meter surface area. Even so it's turned out to be extremely popular with birds and mammals and this year the resident smooth newts found it. It has three plants in that are doing well and now need to be thinned a bit and I'm about to add an oxygenating plant - would it be okay to remove everything then clean out the pond and do the thinning out, then add the oxygenator?
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  • RedwingRedwing SussexPosts: 1,228
    edited September 2021
    I would not recommend that you remove everything for cleaning.  There will be lots of microorganisms and damselfly and other larvae in the water and the mud. These will be what is attracting birds and newts. Digging out each plant individually and dividing would be my recommendation.
    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • Thank you Redwing, the water is deep enough for dragonflies but I think that the surface area is too small for them, (mind you a brown hawker came to inspect the possibilities recently so fingers crossed) even so yes you are absolutely right that there will be all kinds of wee beasties in the water/mud even though it's a tiny pond - it is amazing the difference it has made to the number and variety of visitors I get to the garden. There is always someone having a bath! I added a birdbath as well - a posh name for an upturned metal dustbin lid set in a large flower pot and sprinkled with stones!  Thanks again and I'll take your advice and take the plants out one at a time.

  • RedwingRedwing SussexPosts: 1,228
    Thank you Redwing, the water is deep enough for dragonflies but I think that the surface area is too small for them, (mind you a brown hawker came to inspect the possibilities recently so fingers crossed) even so yes you are absolutely right that there will be all kinds of wee beasties in the water/mud even though it's a tiny pond - it is amazing the difference it has made to the number and variety of visitors I get to the garden. There is always someone having a bath! I added a birdbath as well - a posh name for an upturned metal dustbin lid set in a large flower pot and sprinkled with stones!  Thanks again and I'll take your advice and take the plants out one at a time.

    You're welcome. Having a pond, even a small one, is the single biggest and best thing you can do to attract more wildlife to a garden. As for oxygenators: stick to a native species; hornwort and the milfoils are best.  Some of the non natives can be invasive so best avoided.
    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    Even tiny ponds are fine for all sorts of wildlife. A variety of depths, good access, and appropriate planting is all that's really needed. That planting is also about what you have nearby to provide cover for small creatures and birds.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thank you Redwing and Fairygirl for your helpful comments
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    How did I know you were going to advertise @rikkis045PGSjsgTS...
    Not funny. Pay up or p*** off.   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    Now he's flagged me  :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Very unpleasant comments here, I won't be using this website again.
  • steephillsteephill Posts: 2,474
    The comment was directed at a spammer who was posting unauthorised advertising links.
  • RedwingRedwing SussexPosts: 1,228
    Fairygirl said:
    How did I know you were going to advertise @rikkis045PGSjsgTS...
    Not funny. Pay up or p*** off.   :)
    Eh?
    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
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