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How should we fund Social Care?

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  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,194
    Well they absolutely can’t send him home until they’ve done that. 🤗 
    Welcome to Devon care,  you remember the time I had that was 6 years ago, seems it’s not changed.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FireFire LondonPosts: 11,607
    Yes @Fire but the available housing stock is mostly away from the high pressure areas of the south east


    I honestly don't believe this at all. I believe there is no shortage of housing in the south east. The problem is pricing and raised expectations. In my area of north London, for example, there are loads of shared housing and bedsits for younger people and students just starting out, for reasonable prices too, but I hear cries from young people I know that they don't want to share with many others or live at the end of the tube lines. They want to live near tubes and near town and not travel on long bus journeys. One of my young lodgers told me that her expectation was to rent a two bed appartment with a music studio in the garden in zone two, while she was earning £10 an hour. This is an an uncommon mismatch of wishes versus realities.

    The expectations have changed radically for families - they now want a private drive, a spare room, a large kitchen and garden. These are not unreasonable but it's these elements that are frustrating people. I would say that until the 2000s, there wasn't an expectation that regular people had a spare room for guests or an office/studio, for example. Me and my friends didn't grow up with that idea. When we had guests to stay the kids bunked with the adults or slept on cushions on the floor and we had a camp bed.  My dad worked at the kitchen table. We looked for parking in the street and had a series of clapped out second hand cars.

    None of this is ideal or 'worthy' (I didn't used to live in a lake) but I think affluenza has got to people and there is outrage that they 'only' have a patio garden or no SUV. This to me is a big switch around over the last fifty years.

    - -

    To touch on RG's point, there is a huge amount of building in London going on (re Johnson's crazy home building goals), but most of it is ending up as 'luxury flats' for huge profits by bent developers, as you might expect.  There are pied a terres for use now and again, empty houses, houses kept by magnates for investment purposes.

    The problem is not supply of housing but the ditching of regulation in the mid-1990s that led to a market free-for-all.

  • gondorgondor Posts: 117
    I thought I already paid for social care through council tax so I was annoyed to read this headline about more tax to pay. CT has gone up 2-3% every year (social care precept) for the past few years and this year it was 8%.
    I highly doubt that my CT bill will be reduced if NI is increased.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 5,736
    Hostafan1 said:
    Just back from hospital

    They wanted to move G to a care home where I'd not be allowed to visit for 14 days. 

    As he's not likely to live for much longer, if at all. I've agreed / been forced, to have him home again.

    The nearest alternative bed is in Bristol which is only 125 miles away.

    They can set up a "care package " with home visits: they take 4 weeks to set up. !

    I don't know the medical situation, and it's none of my business, but would he be able to get support from MacMillan ?
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,951
    KT53 said:
    Hostafan1 said:
    Just back from hospital

    They wanted to move G to a care home where I'd not be allowed to visit for 14 days. 

    As he's not likely to live for much longer, if at all. I've agreed / been forced, to have him home again.

    The nearest alternative bed is in Bristol which is only 125 miles away.

    They can set up a "care package " with home visits: they take 4 weeks to set up. !

    I don't know the medical situation, and it's none of my business, but would he be able to get support from MacMillan ?
    He has 8 inoperable tumors
    Devon.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 11,607
    Hostafan1 said:
    Fire said:
    @Hostafan1 are there no hospice possibilities?
    He's not near enough death to be given a bed

    I'm sorry about that. Our local hospices offer respite care as well as very end of life.
  • didywdidyw East SuffolkPosts: 1,024
    The whole system is completely broken.  It will take a lot of money and the political will to fix it.  This can only be done through raising taxes, stopping wasting money on vanity projects, paying consultants etc etc.  NI came adrift from funding care ages ago and increasing that will hit the lowest paid disproportionately.  Raise the higher rate of tax, close tax avoidance loopholes, get the likes of Amazon, Google & Starbucks to pay tax on UK earnings, put a cap on rents landlords can charge, encourage (and fund) local councils to compulsory purchase empty houses and build more social housing.  Stop overseas owners owning more than one property in this country.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 8,213
    I just can't see what the objection is to selling your house to fund your care home stay, although admittedly it's more difficult if it's one half of a couple. It is possible in that scenario to have the costs taken out of the house value when the survivor dies.  It's what we plan to do, if you can't live in it, why not sell it? As for leaving it to the children, yes I'd be sad if I couldn't but tough, life isn't fair and they'll just have to lump it.

    I'm also quite willing to pay NI or another tax to fund social care, we have a big, big crisis in this country and something's got to be done right now. If it means I have to economise, so be it. I've done it before and can do it again. It might even do me good to give up these expensive meals out.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,808
    Selling our home to fund our care is one thing … but there’s a large proportion of our children’s generation who are not and may never be home owners.

     Unless we sort this out PDQ the time will soon come when very few elderly folk will be able to contribute to funding their own care … then the sh*t really will hit the fan re paying for the humane care the elderly infirm need. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FireFire LondonPosts: 11,607
    edited 6 September
    There is a huge wedge of people in the UK with no savings, pensions, owned home, inheritances coming, investments or any other assets. What they have to offer is debt, and they are going to be royally screwed in the not very distant future. They've lived all their lives hand to mouth (sometimes quite royally) and not given the future much thought. I have many friends in that camp. It's deeply worrying.
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