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How should we fund Social Care?

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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,887
    punkdoc said:
    We agree on an awful lot @Hostafan1, except sport.
    I concur 
    Devon.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,653
    If I'd had the sort of job which didn't have extra pension cover in the pay packet and didn't leave me enough to invest in my own pension plan I'd be feeling very poor living on just a UK state pension.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,887
    edited 5 September
    Obelixx said:
    If I'd had the sort of job which didn't have extra pension cover in the pay packet and didn't leave me enough to invest in my own pension plan I'd be feeling very poor living on just a UK state pension.
    ditto, and that's my position now. but sooner my LOT than my daughters' generation who work all the hours god sends to pay punitive rents, with NO hope of ever getting onto the property ladder. 
    I don't think many of their generation think those living in homes worth several £100Ks with no mortgage are "poor".
    All things are relative. 
    Devon.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,653
    Punitive rents are a feature of housing mis-management @Hostafan1 - not enough homes available and no controls on UK rents and contracts like there is over here - certainly in Belgium and Germany - means landlords can charge exorbitant amounts and kick tenants out when they like. 

    In France rent controls had been abolished but they were re-introduced in Paris where there has been a cap on rent levels since 2019 and they are based on location, size and age of the property.  Other French cities intend to follow.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,113
    edited 5 September
    I'm happy for it to come out of NI so long as we scrap this idea of paying 12% under £50K and 2% on anything over that. Let's flatten it. I like the idea that there's a link between the NI you pay and the social/health benefits you get in return. I wouldn't be averse to raising NI as well as flattening it if that meant your social care and state pension was really good. 

    I can't stand this idea of funding social care on an individual basis via your property, this is inherently unequal - people shouldn't be 'punished' for having higher social care needs, and there's a disproportionate impact if your property value is modest. For most people, inheriting property is the main way of passing on intergenerational wealth. I'm not averse to inheritance taxes but they should be reasonable and applied equitably/progressively.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,887
    edited 5 September
    Loxley said:
    I'm happy for it to come out of NI so long as we scrap this idea of paying 12% under £50K and 2% on anything over that. Let's flatten it. I like the idea that there's a link between the NI you pay and the social/health benefits you get in return. I wouldn't be averse to raising NI as well as flattening it if that meant your social care and state pension was really good. 

    I can't stand this idea of funding social care on an individual basis via your property, this is inherently unequal - people shouldn't be 'punished' for having higher social care needs, and there's a disproportionate impact if your property value is modest. For most people, inheriting property is the main way of passing on intergenerational wealth. I'm not averse to inheritance taxes but they should be reasonable and applied equitably/progressively.
    Indeed so. 
    Why does someone on £50K pay a greater percentage of their wages  NI as someone getting £500K? it's just a way of the rich getting even richer.
    Devon.
  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 3,092
    edited 5 September

    But social care is such a vast expense that payment restructuring will be needed, with our rapidly ageing population, and many people living so much longer. Issues like diabetes 2, obesity, smoking and alcohol related illnesses make the burden all the more acute.
    I would have thought that the things you list there are beneficial to the exchequer. These folk die younger than they would otherwise do and so do not receive pensions and other benefits that would be granted to them had they lived longer. Certainly smokers make a substantial net contribution. 

    The issue of an ageing society definitely needs addressing. We need a young workforce to work and pay their taxes: child benefit is part of the wider policy to facilitate this. Fortunately we are not in such a dire situation as some other countries like Italy, Poland, Spain, South Korea and several more whose populations could halve from their current number by 2100.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,887
    The only thing I inherited from my parents is my name and my DNA.
    Devon.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,113
    There are families where the parents are sat in homes that have skyrocketed in value, and none of the kids have a chance in hell of getting on the property ladder, I don't want those people penalised. Then there seem to be far too many people floating around whos' only achievement in life was being lucky enough to have extraordinarily rich parents... happy for those people to be taxed till they squeak ;P If I was dictator for a day I would cap the amount you can inherit at 2x the average UK property value and have the state take the rest to pay for new council housing.
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 17,153
    In France I pay a "social charge" on my pension and people who go to hospital pay for their board and lodging, but they usually take out an insurance to cover it, also we pay roughly 7€ for each visit to a GP but the poorest people are free. Why shouldn't the British pay a bit more for their health and care, but exempt the worst off?
    Dordogne and Norfolk
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