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How to partition a trough planter

Hi all,

I've just bought an L-shaped wooden planter, with each 'arm' of the planter being 150cm long.

I first want to plant climbing ivy in one arm of planter, as one side has a trellis attached which will create a screen. However, I would like to use the rest of the planter for fruit and vegetables in the spring.

Can anyone tell me what the best way to partition/section off parts of the planter, so I don't have to fill the entire planter with compost just yet? Is this something people have experience with? I have no experience using planters!

Many thanks
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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,349
    I just use timber - best to cover it in plastic to prevent rotting. Screwed into place, or attached using small battens or brackets.

    What dimensions is the planter though? Many ivies are quite thuggish, so you'd need to be careful. That could have a serious impact on your other plants, as they spread by running and rooting. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • simonscarfesimonscarfe Posts: 8
    edited September 2021
    The planter is 30cm wide by 50cm deep. This is why I wanted to partition, as I know that ivy can be a handful! I was thinking as long as I keep the roots separated from the other plants (when I get them) I can keep an eye on the ivy's activities above ground. Good call re waterproofing the partition material 👍🏽
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,349
    edited September 2021
    I do it in all my raised beds so that I can have planting which likes different conditions growing together. 
    The ivy variety is a factor though - some are much better behaved. Don't plant one of the bigger, world dominating kinds  ;)

    If you have the waterproofing plastic layer along the bottom too, that helps prevent dehydration, and also rot, and if you have it without a break for the ivy, so that it's kept really separate from the other side, that'll help contain it. Add a bit of sealant along the bottom of the barrier too. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I've got some Irish ivy/hedera helix hibernica, which I was told would do the trick.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,349
    No - don't use that! 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Haha really? Is it a swine? Which variety should I use then? 
  • I was told it's very similar to English ivy, but should be manageable
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,349
    It covers buildings, and most other things,  when you turn your back.  :)

    In a container, it would certainly be more 'contained', but go for smaller leaved types. They tend to be less aggressive. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,349
    Have a look at some different varieties here

    https://www.jacksonsnurseries.co.uk/plants/plant-type/climbers/ivy-plants/


    There will be other outlets that have a range too. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,453
    Maybe plant the Ivy in a large pot buried within the planter. But realistically it's not suitable in the long term. Some of the smaller (4-6ft) Clematis might be more suitable, if you can keep watered.
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