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Help with identifying a few plants?

Hello all

I'm still struggling to identify some of the plants that have appeared in my new (moved in December 2020) garden and hope you can help with these?  The first one might be considered a weed as it grows prolifically, hasn't flowered (yet) and tends to creep over the soil, also the leaves have a very distinctive/sweetish aroma. Is the 3rd one Acanthus Mollis?  Many thanks

Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,700
    Photo 1 looks like Ground Ivy, Glechoma Hederacea.
    Photo 2 could be a Euphorbia Cyparissias. Cut one down to see if there is a milky sap.
    Photo 3, I agree with you there, looks like an Acanthus plant.
  • Hi Borderline, thanks for the suggestions.  With the Glechoma Hederacea (Ground Ivy) the only thing is that it hasn't flowered at all?  It just creeps around the borders and into the lawns.  If it is this, that is yet another invasive plant I have inherited!!!
    Does anyone else have any thoughts on the 3 plants and whether Borderline is correct?
    Many thanks.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,844
    edited September 2021
    I'd agree with @Borderline, although I wouldn't have known the variety of Euphorbia. It certainly looks like one, and the milky sap when cut is the clincher. Just be careful though, and try not to get it on bare skin. 
    Ground ivy isn't very common here - I've certainly never had it in any garden, but it certainly looks like it. The foliage has a scent if crushed apparently, so perhaps try that  :)
    Should have said - I think it's spring flowering, so you wouldn't have seen it flowering if you only moved there in December. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Thanks - I just checked and it does have a white milky sap so that's definitely a Euphorbia.  I'm just wondering if it is invasive or not (it just appeared and although it looks nice and textural (no flowers as yet) it has grown up right through a Hydrangea!)
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,844
    Some of them can be quite thuggish. They can seed around quite readily   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,325
    It'll have to be the hydrangea or the euphorbia. The hydrangea will probably lose the battle of you leave them together.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Oh dear - think it will have to be the Hydrangea - bye bye Euphorbia!
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,844
    I've just noticed the bits of hydrangea poking up the sides of that euphorbia. Oops!
    It should be fairly easy to pull the euphorbia out though, as long as you're careful.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,689
    edited September 2021
    Euphorbia cyparissias only grows to about 30cm or so max, so shouldn't cause the Hydrangea any problems, unless it's a dwarf Hydrangea of some type. It does spread though. Beautiful flowers in early spring.
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
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