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Giant buddleia

Hello. I have a huge buddleia that attracts bees and butterflies. They are swarming all over it at the moment. My problem is that because of its size, it casts a large shadow over the other plants nearby. We are planning to move it somewhere else next year but I want to know if I can prune it hard after flowering so that next year it will be more manageable ???? I've attached some pictures to show you. Thanks

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    Yes is the easy answer.
    Normally, you prune them back a bit in autumn, just to avoid them being top heavy over winter, and then hard prune in spring, but you can hack them back to move them without any problem.  :)
    You can always use the cuttings to make new plants too. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • shazza 3shazza 3 Posts: 181
    Thanks for the reply. I usually cut it down to about half its size to stop it being damaged by the wind. I'll have to look at how to get new ones from it. No doubt there's info on here somewhere
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    Just cut bits off and stick them in pots, following the usual procedure - take a bit around  8 inches [not vital to be exact] cut below a leaf joint, nip the top out, and remove the bottom leaves. 2 or 3 round the edge of a 6 inch pot is quite good, but you can stick bits in the ground and they'll root.
    They're the easiest thing in the world to propagate. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 22,301
    My white buddleia is a giant this year too. Despite being cut down to sticks last year, some of the branches are a good 12ft high and all blossom is fasciated. As with everything weird this year, I blame it on the weather, brexit or covid.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    My white one was always big, but my dark ones are around ten foot every year too. I struggle to reach the tops to deadhead so I have to use a stepladder   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • shazza 3shazza 3 Posts: 181
    what does fasciated mean ??? i'm definitely going to try and root a few twigs in the ground. i've got enough space to try a couple of pieces, see if they take or not, it's probably easier than pots as i'm trying to get rid of all my plastic ones. i shall keep a note of when planted etc and try and protect them through the winter. thanks   
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145
    It's a fairly common phenomenon which means flowers  [ and sometimes foliage] don't develop as they would normally.

    Whole thread here

    https://forum.gardenersworld.com/discussion/388011/fascinated-by-fasciation/p1
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • shazza 3shazza 3 Posts: 181
    ok thanks. i had no idea what it meant, thought it was a new disease   :)
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