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Overwintering Gaura in pots

Hello,

I've just bought three Gaura plants that I plan to plant out in spring. I bought them now as they were going cheap! The roots were growing out the bottom a little so I've potted them on in slightly larger containers.

I'm planning on overwintering them in our brick built wash house so they'll be protected from frosts, but wasn't sure about watering. I previously lost one I had grown from a cutting and I'm not sure if I over or under watered it. 

How much/little water should I give them do you think? 

Thank you in advance,

Robert
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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,739
    Just enough to keep them ticking over.  :)
    Make sure they have enough light though. Does the wash house have windows? 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 1,498
    edited August 2021
    Depends where you live.  I've overwintered them in the ground against a SW wall  in Sussex and in a mild winter they will survive but sometimes they won't.  Also in pots in a cold frame has worked too.
    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • The wash house does have a large West facing window, so light should be ok. So less rather than more When it comes to watering then? 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,739
    If they're small, less is definitely more, but you'll have to judge it yourself. You can tell by the weight  of the pot when you lift it, whether it's dry or not , so its worth trying to get a feel of that before it's much colder  :)

    They don't generally survive the colder winters here without some kind pf protection, even reasonably well established ones. Some will be a bit tougher than others too. I've given up with them. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Funnily enough I have heard that a lot over the past few years, but I've obviously been lucky and only lost one in the ground in the last 7 years. Three others have done really well. I've even moved them without any issues, despite subsequently being told they don't transplant well.

    I'm hoping my luck continues with these ones! I love them. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,739
    Depends on where you live and your local climate.  :)
    Too much wet, cold, and ice in winter here. Snow is often fine, as it insulates, but wet then a freeze is hopeless, especially if it's day after day. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • I think the fact that most of mine grow on slight slopes might help. I'll also be sure you add lots of grit to the soil. Going to do that with the whole bed as I'll also be planting lavenders, grasses and sedums in the same new border. Aiming for a pretty much water-free border. 

    Thanks everyone for your advice. 
  • Balgay.HillBalgay.Hill Posts: 1,083
    edited August 2021
    Maybe i've been lucky, but i've had a clump in a pot outside (NE Scotland) for 4 or 5 years.
    It is up against a west facing house wall, so benefits from some rain shadow.
    Sunny Dundee
  • PosyPosy Posts: 3,601
    I think it depends on the soil. I can't keep them over winter but my clay soil gets very waterlogged. The temperature isn't really a problem this far south.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,739
    East side of Scotland has a very different climate to the west, although this year has been an exception, as it's been very dry here. 
    Never sensible to be complacent though  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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