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Help with hydrangea

Does anyone know why my hydrangea is dropping like this could it be from all the rain fall we have had.I only deheaded last years blooms did not cut right back, could this be why???

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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 7,529
    I think you're right - blame the rain.
    Your plant looks really healthy except all the flowerheads are on the ground.
    Some hydrangeas hold up better than others.
    I try and give soaked flowerheads a shake after rain which usually results in them lifting up a bit, until the next downpour.. 

    Not sure if a different pruning technique would help, hopefully someone can chip in and offer advice.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 108
    Thanks Pete, yeah I do take very good care of them but like you said could be rain as it’s been so heavy in Essex lately. Or maybe this year I’ll give them a hard prune right down to the bottom 
  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 6,556
    Don't prune them this year,they should be pruned in spring. Leave the dry headsvon as winter protection
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,640
    No - don't prune them now, as already said. 
    Spring is the time for that, and you only take them back to the next leaf joint. However, you can certainly cut them right back hard, and the only harm it will do is that you'll forego the flowers for next year.
    You can also use the 3 year method, when you cut back hard a third of the stems, and just prune the other as normal. The following year you do the same to another third, and the last third in the third year. That means you rejuvenate the whole shrub over the three year period, but will also have flowers. 
    That would mainly be for an older shrub which needs rejuvenating. 
    Another reason for them being a bit top heavy is if they're being over fed. That can lead to a lot of quick growing, soft sappy stems and foliage, which is less able to support itself.
    Rain alone will not affect them in any way :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 108
    Thanks fairlygirl but I don’t ever feed them I was told never feed hydrangeas as it can cause wilting and weak stems but I will definitely do what you suggest pruning wise thank you 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,640
    No bother - it's just one of those things that can certainly cause weaker growth, so it's always worth asking the question  :)
    Some slow release food in spring [B,F&Bone for instance] sprinkled round the base is all they would ever need, and they barely need that if the soil is decent. Mulching with compost or bark to preserve moisture is always good, and helps the soil structure.  :)

    Even a spell of weather where they've had wet then warmth can be enough to make then shoot up, and then they get a bit floppy for that same reason. They just get a bit beyond themselves  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 108
    Ok thanks fairy girl I’ll will definitely do that thanks for your advice 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 7,529
    I agree a small handful (about 1oz/30g) of blood, fish and bone in the spring is beneficial.
    It's not so much as feeding the plant, but replacing the nutrients that your plant has taken out of the soil in the previous year.

    Everything in my garden gets a light sprinkling of BFB and seaweed meal in the spring
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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