Forum home Plants

Hedge horror

scdettmer69scdettmer69 Posts: 9
new home, jungle garden. No idea what it is or what to do with it. New to gardening. Do I chop it right down, will it grow back, can I save it! Help please
«13

Posts

  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,471
    It looks like a Philadelphus to me, others can confirm (and give correct advice about pruning).  It wouldn't be my first choice as hedging, as it has specific pruning requirements (versus something like Privet, which can be cut pretty much as you like). 
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,447
    It’s is Philadelphus, not a hedging plant, it’s a shrub that needs pruning to keep it nice. 
    https://www.gardenguides.com/79127-prune-philadelphus-mock-orange.html

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,447
    You could cut it all right back to 30cms but it won’t flower next year,  but will the year after. 
    Looking at it again I think that’s what I would do.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,390
    The good thing is that they [philadelphus] benefit from pruning quite hard to keep them rejuvenated and healthy.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,447
    They do Fairygirl,  I do that with my Hydrangeas every so often. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,390
    They do benefit from a good hacking , don't they?  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • scdettmer69scdettmer69 Posts: 9
    Thanks so much for the responses. I am sure I will be putting many questions on here as new to gardening. Lady who lived here had let everything go crazy. Our privacy will be reduced if we hack it down to 30cm but I suppose there are things we can do about that. Thanks again. 
  • steephillsteephill Posts: 2,072
    Try the 3 year pruning cycle - take out 1/3rd of the old stems each year until it has been fully renewed.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 71,927
    edited 30 July
    In that case the other way of cutting it back might be more appealing … that is to cut out one third of the stems (the oldest chunkiest ones) at the base this year … then next year cut out the next third, and the following year the same. 

    Each year the ones you cut out will be replaced by some new canes … so after three years you’ll have a completely new shrub. 

    And this way you’ll also have some flowers each year 😊 

    Pull out as much of the ivy as you can … then  feed the root area with some Fish, Blood & Bone which is a slow release organic fertiliser and that’ll give it a boost, and mulch the roof area with something like well rotted farmyard manure or composted bark. That’ll help keep any weed growth down and  improve the soil which the shrub will like. 

    😊 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • scdettmer69scdettmer69 Posts: 9
    Think I am going to be saying thank you a lot!!! Pic of garden in current state after filling a 7 cubic meter skip (apologies for metric but I live in Germany} Lots of work to do but no rush. Cheers

Sign In or Register to comment.