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Azalea problem

A friend has an Azalea in a pot in a sunny position that flowered well but new growth appears deformed and results in a hard material.  Any clues?  These photos may help.
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  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 6,571
    They are Japanese woodland plants prefer some shade, especially mid summer. A huge amount of rain water in a pot guarantee next year's flowers. I would remove the dead areas,did they remove the spent flowers? Put in a shady spot and water 
  • WillieB06WillieB06 Posts: 25
    Spent flowers were still on.  I asked them to remove them.  Maybe they should move it to a less sunny position.  But, what do you think the issue may be as the new leaves are almost bulbous and open deformed?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,835
    Sunny position and pot - 2 things that make it difficult for them   :)
    Some shade and watering with rainwater will help, if you don't live in an area with soft water. Suitable growing medium too, if it's staying potted. Not compost. 
    I've no idea what the 'growth' is - perhaps a gall of some kind, although the water could be a source? 
    Azaleas and rhodos just grow here with very little intervention, so it's not something I've ever seen. We have the perfect climate for them in the west of Scotland. Our tap water is also soft, so we don't need to collect rainwater for watering plants which prefer that. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • WillieB06WillieB06 Posts: 25
    Snap.  We live in the Central Lowlands, so perfect climate.  Dawyck isn't far away and they have beautiful Rhoddys and Azaleas.  I did think the pot may be an issue!  

    They also have a Hydrangea in a pot next to it which hasn't flowered, apparently, this year or last.  I have suggested pruning too hard.  It is green enough but not at all tall.  Just a small mound of green leaves about 30cm - 40cm diameter.  Not sure what the issue may be.  Root constriction??
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,835
    Pots are really no use for hydrangeas for any length of time - even decent sized ones.  :)
    Pruning at the wrong time is definitely a factor, but it sounds like a young plant anyway. Pruning also depends on the type. Do you know what it is? 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • WillieB06WillieB06 Posts: 25
    I'm afraid I have no idea of the type.  Probably mophead.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,835
    That's ok. It possibly is the pruning being too severe. They would only get cut back to a pair of new leaf buds around April or so. Paniculatas get treated differently, and cut back harder, because they flower on new wood, as opposed to the others which flower on the older wood. 
    However, I think the pot is the big problem. If it's a youngish shrub, it would be ok for a while, but getting them flowering if they don't have room can be tricky, and they need a bit of help with the soil and nutrition in a pot.  Difficult without seeing it though.  :)

    I wonder if they bought it as one of those forced plants which appear for the Easter market? It's always a problem, and there have been lots of queries, particularly this year, about them. It can take a while for them to recover, strengthen up and start growing the way they would normally. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • PianoplayerPianoplayer Posts: 489
    Hi - the strange growths on the azalea are galls, I think:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/azalea/azalea-leaf-gall.htm

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=740

    I think they are unsightly rather than damaging. I suspect your friends probably just need to improve their cultivation and hygiene!
  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 6,571
    I wonder if the hydrangea suffered from the last frosts this year. I know a lot of folk on here had problems with Frost damage on quite big specimens. Don't tell fairy,my small one is still in a pot because I want to keep in it the startling electric blue
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,835
    Too late @Nanny Beach  :D
    My mophead hydrangeas are unlikely to flower this year due to heavy frosts just after I'd pruned. Such is life.
    Strange that it was last year too though. That winter was mild for most of Scotland, so late frost would only be likely if they were in a glen somewhere, or at real altitude. There were ground frosts forecast in glens for today up here   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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