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Is it normal for a fruit tree to reach over 1mt without growing branches?

The tree  on the left is 41 inches tall, and the other two are close behind.



It seems a bit unusual to me that there are no branches yet. I'm hoping branches will appear at some point soon, without me 'stopping' the height by cutting the top off  the main stem.

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  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,061
    Are these the ones you've grown from seeds, or are they commercial ones grafted onto rootstocks?  Either way I'd say it's normal for a one year old sapling and these are called 'whips' when bought in the dormant season.  If growing 'normal' vase-shaped free-standing fruit trees, then you obviously don't want branches forming below 3 to 4 feet anyway.
    Now is the time when you decide how you are going to train them, but if on rootstocks, that will determine what you can do to a large extent.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,625
    edited 28 July
    You are the proud owner of three “unfeathered maidens”.😁

    Take a look at this page and see what to do about making the, turn into “feathered maidens”.



    The book is called Growing Fruit and it is by Harry Baker. I recommend everyone to buy a copy.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 3,979
    Yep need to know what fruit they are (variety) and what rootstock. 
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,625
    Long life variety.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • young codgeryoung codger Posts: 362
    edited 28 July
    Are these the ones you've grown from seeds, or are they commercial ones grafted onto rootstocks?  Either way I'd say it's normal for a one year old sapling and these are called 'whips' when bought in the dormant season.  If growing 'normal' vase-shaped free-standing fruit trees, then you obviously don't want branches forming below 3 to 4 feet anyway.
    Now is the time when you decide how you are going to train them, but if on rootstocks, that will determine what you can do to a large extent.
    Yes Bob, I have grown all 3 of them from seed. Thank you for your advice and reassurance that it is normal. 

    I welcome advice on what to do next, and when,  regarding the seceteurs.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,061
    I agree with @pansyface and would get a copy of that book if you can - very cheap online - mine only cost a couple of quid or so. :)
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • young codgeryoung codger Posts: 362
    pansyface said:
    You are the proud owner of three “unfeathered maidens”.😁

    Take a look at this page and see what to do about making the, turn into “feathered maidens”.



    The book is called Growing Fruit and it is by Harry Baker. I recommend everyone to buy a copy.
    Thank you Pansyface. As a single man I will look forward to being the owner of 3 unfettered maidens.       👅👅👅


  • young codgeryoung codger Posts: 362
    Yep need to know what fruit they are (variety) and what rootstock. 
    Happy to share those details Purplerallim.

    The centre tree is plumb, of Tesco fruit isle variety. The tree each side are both Golden delicious,  from Aldi. None are on rootstock. Thank you.
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 3,979
    As these will be on own rootstock then they could make big trees. Plum is probably Victoria maybe.
    You have the delight of deciding what shape you want. I would do a bit a reading before going ahead and pruning for shape, as only you know what space you have for future size, but they could get very big.
    Just be patient as it will take 3 to 5 years before you get any fruit.
  • young codgeryoung codger Posts: 362
    edited 28 July
    @purplerallim
    Thank you. Yes, I will look online for a copy of that book mentioned above.

    The apple trees I have grown, of which there are many have all been Golden delicious. From France apparently. 

    The plumbs however, have been all sorts of varieties - mainly from South Africa according to the labels. Hence it may be interesting to see what happens- and whether they survive our winters.

    The first plums  have been outdoors since 2019. We have not seen the mercury drop too far in recent years. Maybe I will get them to a size that can withstand  very cold  winters. They are all outdoors now of course, even the Peach tree, of which I only have one.

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