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Bees

Birdgirl82Birdgirl82 East YorkshirePosts: 25
Hi,

First and foremost I'd like to say I am 100% all for wildlife in my garden and I am actively encouraging wildlife into my garden.

I have noticed I have bees in my lawn. I've seen several entering a hole in my back garden lawn laden with pollen for the last couple of weeks. I've planted lots of pollen rich flowers and plants in my front garden but my back garden is having some raised beds and new lawn laid some point soon and I would like some advice on how to deter them. I absolutely don't want them destroyed and I know that it is great to have them there but at the moment, they are in the way. I would be happy for them to be there once the work has been done but don't want to harm them during the work. 

Does anyone have any advice on how to encourage them away from this area please? 

Please be gentle with me 😁. I really want them in my garden in the future, but just not right now.

Thank you in advance

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,797
    That's a pity. They really won't be there for long.  :)
    If there's a way of leaving the area they're in until last, that would help, but they may well move on themselves if workmen are nearby. If you were able to dig out the section of lawn they're in and put it in a corner somewhere, that might work, but it would have to be sufficiently deep and wide enough to get the whole nest, so I can't be sure if that would even be possible at all. 
    I'm afraid I can't offer any other advice.
    Some of the 'boys' here who are very proficient with all sorts of wildlife might have an idea of how to proceed. @wild edges and @Alan Clark2 in Liverpool will hopefully see my tags. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Birdgirl82Birdgirl82 East YorkshirePosts: 25
    Fairygirl said:
    That's a pity. They really won't be there for long.  :)
    If there's a way of leaving the area they're in until last, that would help, but they may well move on themselves if workmen are nearby. If you were able to dig out the section of lawn they're in and put it in a corner somewhere, that might work, but it would have to be sufficiently deep and wide enough to get the whole nest, so I can't be sure if that would even be possible at all. 
    I'm afraid I can't offer any other advice.
    Some of the 'boys' here who are very proficient with all sorts of wildlife might have an idea of how to proceed. @wild edges and @Alan Clark2 in Liverpool will hopefully see my tags. 
    If they're likely to move on by themselves then I can wait. I haven't booked the work in so that's not a problem. I just didn't know if they would be there permanently or just temporarily.

    Thank you for replying 
  • edited 26 July
    They sound like Miner Bees. Although the adults will soon go away, their young will develop underground and will not emerge until next Spring.

    https://www.gardenseeker.com/lawn-care/pests-diseases/miner-bees/
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,797
    Ah - I knew you or wild edges would know @Alan Clark2 in Liverpool   :)
    I wasn't sure what the scenario would be with the young 'uns. 
    Is there anything @Birdgirl82 can do, do you think?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Birdgirl82Birdgirl82 East YorkshirePosts: 25
    edited 26 July
    They sound like Miner Bees. Although the adults will soon go away, their young will develop underground and will not emerge until next Spring.

    https://www.gardenseeker.com/lawn-care/pests-diseases/miner-bees/

     Definitely not Miner Bees. I'm pretty sure they're White-Tailed Bumblebees.
  • If they are Bumblebees then the nest will be abandoned in Autumn and the young queen bees will hibernate elsewhere, then start a new nest in the Spring. If there are lots of bees going into the nest then they are Bumblebees, if there is only one bee visiting each nest then they are solitary bees, and the young bees will spend the winter under the lawn and emerge next Spring.
  • Birdgirl82Birdgirl82 East YorkshirePosts: 25
    If they are Bumblebees then the nest will be abandoned in Autumn and the young queen bees will hibernate elsewhere, then start a new nest in the Spring. If there are lots of bees going into the nest then they are Bumblebees, if there is only one bee visiting each nest then they are solitary bees, and the young bees will spend the winter under the lawn and emerge next Spring.

    There's quite a few (at least 6) visiting so hopefully they'll disappear of their own accord. I will wait a bit longer for the work to be done. I've waited nearly 2 years so another few months won't hurt 😂.

    Thanks for the advice
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,797
    "I've waited nearly 2 years so another few months won't hurt 😂."

    I know the feeling   ;)

    I had white tailed bees nesting last year in my hog house. I could see the little holes in the turf banked up nearby in my little wildlife area, from the queen overwintering. I had hoped there would be some this year, and I made a little box [ a mini hog house] especially for them. However, some wasps have moved in instead. Two wasp nests now - and unfortunately both are right in the area I've had to work in through the last week repairing a fence.  :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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