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PICKLING/FERMENTING/SALTING - whatever you call it.

pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,546
I’m overwhelmed with enormous, out of control cucumbers just now and have been looking for ideas as to what to do with them.

Thank you @Dovefromabove for your cucumber relish recipe. I am just waiting for the supermarket to deliver a green pepper and some bottling jars and I shall be giving it a go.

In the meantime, I thought I’d I’d try my hand at fermenting some of the larger ones. I’ve never done anything like this before. I found this recipe and thought that I’d give it a go.


Being a complete novice, I have no idea what the result after four days should look like. But here it us. (If this is what fermented food really looks like then there must have been some pretty desperate people about in the old days). 

The appearance of it, with its wrinkly skin, is not appealing. In fact, every instinct tells me to throw it down the drain. Does anybody know if this witches’ brew is safe to eat?


Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,075
    I've made Kimchi in the past and have done a lot of brewing over the years and none of it has looked like what you have Pansy - I don't think it's turned out quite as it should.
    The kimchi I've made obviously ferments, you can see the bubbles rising and there's a foam on the surface - and it smells fermented
    Dare I ask what yours smells like? 😁
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,546
    It smells of dill and salty water. It doesn’t smell bad. It’s more the look of it. No bubbles. 
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,382
    Hi @pansyface ... I think I'm correct in saying you may have some reduced immunity problems?  I'd be a bit careful of home-fermented stuff ... 

    I have some good friends on the Food Forum who do quite a bit of home fermenting of sauerkrauts, kimchi and stuff like that ... I hope you don't mind ... I've asked them to have a look at your post and see what they think ... 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,075
    No bubbles means it's not fermented for some reason Pansy.
    When I made kimchi the recipe didn't mention boiling water and when it's left to ferment I just draped a tea-towel over the jar, not a lid (as that will also stop wild yeats getting in).
    Boiling water will kill any live wild yeasts - which is what is needed to start fermentation.
    It took 2 days before it started to ferment and worked out quite well - except I added so much garlic it made my eyes water.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,546
    Hello Dove, thanks for passing on details of my plight to others.🙂

    I once read that the evolution and improvement of species was partly based on one individual in a group being the bravest/most foolhardy and trying something new while the less adventurous sat back and waited to see what happened. 

    I am definitely a sit back and wait to see girl.😁
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 4,405
    How about making soup ready for the winter with your cucumber,  you just take out the seeds and use like courgette @pansyface
  • TopbirdTopbird Mid SuffolkPosts: 7,221
    edited July 2021
    Never actually fermented veg but I've certainly considered having a go.
     
    I was a bit surprised by the use of boiling water in the recipe above. The recipes for sauerkraut etc that I've seen seem to salt the veg for an hour or so to extract natural juices and form a bit of a veg brine and then just cover with cold water to exclude air. It's important to keep the veg submerged in the brine so some also mention weighting with plates etc.

    The brew is then covered with a lid (presumably to stop anything unwanted getting in) but all the recipes I've seen require you to lift the lid daily to release any gas that's built up. All the recipes certainly refer to bubbles forming indicating fermentation is occuring.

    I think your instincts re the drain might be correct here Pansy...
    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,382
    edited July 2021
    My marvellous friend Scullion who does a lot of fermenting  down in Cornwall (also brews her own vinegar from a 'Mother' etc) says:

    "...according to s.e.katz's, 'art of fermentation', it's a natural yeast growth and should just be removed. they are sill edible but if it's left to grow it sends the veg mushy.
    i can email you the pdf for you to pass on to her if you want.... "

    The book she quotes is widely regarded as the Fermenter's Bible.  

    She's emailing me the pdf.  :) 

    By the way, Scullion is also the source of the Cucumber Relish recipe  :D
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,546
    Thank you all so much for your info.

    I await the pdf with interest.

    Meanwhile, Mr P is all for skimming off the scum and having a taste.

    He obviously belongs to the other evolutionary group from myself. 😊
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,382
    @pansyface if you could PM me your email address I can send you the PDF ... it's too big to upload to the forum.   :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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