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Alternative to Monarda

The four Monarda ‘Croftway Pink’ I have are unfortunately covered in powdery mildew, despite doing all I can to prevent this.

Although I’ve read this doesn’t do any real harm, the plants are losing their appeal and I was wondering if anyone could suggest alternative perennials to grow, which have a similar size and structure?

 Thanks!
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,119
    Astrantia   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • The four Monarda ‘Croftway Pink’ I have are unfortunately covered in powdery mildew, despite doing all I can to prevent this.

    Although I’ve read this doesn’t do any real harm, the plants are losing their appeal and I was wondering if anyone could suggest alternative perennials to grow, which have a similar size and structure?

     Thanks!
    Be  careful with astrantia. I have grown a white one and a red one and they have seeded themselves everywhere. Really invasive as the root balls choke the growth of other plants.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,119
    Never been a problem with me  :)
    Perhaps my conditions prevent it- many plants don't readily self seed here.  I certainly have loads of planting round mine without any problem either. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,620
    Phlomis tuberosa 'Amazone' perhaps
    Stachys monieri 'Hummelo' (maybe a little shorter)
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,045
    My astrantias are also well behaved - I grow Shaggy and Roma both lovely plants.
    Shaggy self-seeds a bit - Roma is sterile so doesn't, but that does mean it'll flower for much longer
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Thanks everyone. I have a couple of astrantia and they are only half the size of my Monarda. 

    I like the look of the Phlomis so I'll see if I can get that somewhere. Part of me though wonders if I should persist with the Monarda as I do like them.

    Does anyone have experience of the Phlomis?

    Thanks. 
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,117
    Are you growing the Monarda in moist soil? Powdery mildew is often a sign that the plant is a bit dry and I think Monarda prefers a bit more dampness, though its not exactly a bog plant. Mine did well in a fairly damp place last year, but  sadly didn't make it through the brutal winter and spring  :(
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,940
    Agastache are easy to grow, long-flowering and don’t suffer from mildew. Cotton Candy is a similar colour and height to your mondarda. Depending where you are, they don’t always make it through the winter so taking cuttings is advisable, plus dig in lots of grit and plant on a slightly raised mound if you have heavy/wet soil.

    I inherited a Phlomis, the yellow one. It was too sprawly and woody so I got rid. Amazone looks lovely. Presumably, like my ex-yellow one, it prefers sun and good drainage?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,119
    Yes - probably too dry as @Buttercupdays says. Mildew is a sign of that.
    My white Astrantia [superstar ] is at least a metre tall. 
    If the site's dry, Agastaches and Veronicas are certainly a great suggestion. Any of the 'daisy' plants would be good too - Heleniums etc.
    Depends on what colours you like as well.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 20,512
    My astrantias are well behaved got all colours, they bloom early, cut them back and off they go again.  Easy to grow from seeds, easy to pull out if you don’t want them.
    A very worth while plant I think.
    I'm taking my Phlomis out,  very untidy once they’ve finished flowering and not that nice to look at, but then I’ve only got the plain yellow one.  Perhaps some are better than others, 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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