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Buddleia Globosa

ERICS MUMERICS MUM Posts: 527
My brother’s “plant” has finished flowering, after a glorious show which the bees absolutely loved.

is it time to prune it now ?  I want to bring it down from about 7 feet to about 4 feet and take out completely some floppy untidy side shoots.  Really just to tidy it up but not stop it flowering next year.

should I feed it - general or rose/tomato food ?

also would the pieces I remove root as cuttings or is it too early, are they too soft ?

thanks
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Posts

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,861
    You do prune those directly after flowering as the new growth they make this year will bring forth next years flowers. 
    I personally don’t feed anything planted out in my garden but a lot of people do so I suppose that’s up to you, it certainly won’t hurt.
    If you can find some decent bits for cuttings, now’s a good time. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,556
    Good to know @Lyn.  Thanks.  I acquired one of these in a recent plant swap and had assumed it would be like other buddleias and flower on new wood. 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • ERICS MUMERICS MUM Posts: 527
    Obelixx said:
    Good to know @Lyn.  Thanks.  I acquired one of these in a recent plant swap and had assumed it would be like other buddleias and flower on new wood. 
    I only found this out after pruning it in early spring for a few years and couldn’t understand why it wasn’t flowering !  In the end Google told me what I was doing wrong !
  • debs64debs64 West Midlands, on the edge of the Black Country Posts: 4,204
    I found this out too late as well and have a healthy plant but no flowers! There’s always next year. 
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 568
    Yes prune now.  Don’t be scared either.  Take back at least by one-third.  It’s amazing how quick it bounces back.  Use some of the non-flowering tips for cuttings, they take really easy
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 568
    Just cut mine back.  Will look scruffy for a few weeks but and brown leaves can just be pulled off


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    I think most people think of davidii whenever Buddliea gets mentioned, but globosa isn't grown as widely.
    Flowers earlier, which is also the clue re pruning. Different beasts  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,556
    edited July 2021
    Mine is part of an experiment with hotter colours and when I saw one was going free in a plant swap I pounced.  Swapped it for a black mulberry - morus nigra - tree I grew from seed from the RHS seed programme. 

    The stronger light we have here needs stronger colours so I'm slowly embracing oranges and fiery reds and golden yellows but still can't do acid yellows.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 568
    The only issue I have with Globosa is that the flowering period is relatively short.  I get flowers for most of June but deadheading doesn’t promote a new flush.  Whilst in flower the bees love it though.  It’s also reliably evergreen here is SE England 
  • SherwoodArrowSherwoodArrow Nottinghamshire Posts: 147
    Does anyone know what type of buddleja this is? 
    I was given the original by my great granny then I’ve taken cuttings from it so I’ve got loads now.
    I never see this type in garden centres or on gardening programmes.
    (Sorry to hijack your post @ERICS MUM )
     
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