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Grasses for a cottage garden style

LesleyHLesleyH Posts: 124
Good Morning!

can anyone recommend some grasses/sedges of all heights that could be dotted into a cottage garden style garden

Thank you
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Posts

  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,418
    Hello Lesley  :)
    I have several Luzula Nivea dotted throughout my garden
    https://www.knollgardens.co.uk/product/luzula-nivea/

    Also miscanthus for autumn and winter interest. There are many varieties available, mine are Adagio, but be aware that they can take up a fair amount of room. 
  • LesleyHLesleyH Posts: 124
    Hi AnniD. Thank you, I really like those 👍🏻
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,678
    For height:
    Calamagrostis Karl Foerster, very graceful, lovely movement in the wind, and is narrow and doesn't take up much space.

    Medium height:
    Miscanthus Ferner Osten is one of the smaller ones, only about 2-3 feet tall.
    Anemanthele lessoniana, arching and graceful, lovely orangey tones

    Low growing:
    Ophiopogon nigrescens, although it's a bit of a marmite plant
    Uncinia rubra/incinata, nice brown/red colouring
    Carex oshimensis Everillo, bright acid green foliage, does better in shade
    Hordeum jubatum, not a grass (it's Foxtail Barley), but would look great in a cottage style garden.  It's an annual, quick and easy to grow from seed.

    Be aware that Sedges prefer much more moist soil than most grasses.
  • LesleyHLesleyH Posts: 124
    For height:
    Calamagrostis Karl Foerster, very graceful, lovely movement in the wind, and is narrow and doesn't take up much space.

    Medium height:
    Miscanthus Ferner Osten is one of the smaller ones, only about 2-3 feet tall.
    Anemanthele lessoniana, arching and graceful, lovely orangey tones

    Low growing:
    Ophiopogon nigrescens, although it's a bit of a marmite plant
    Uncinia rubra/incinata, nice brown/red colouring
    Carex oshimensis Everillo, bright acid green foliage, does better in shade
    Hordeum jubatum, not a grass (it's Foxtail Barley), but would look great in a cottage style garden.  It's an annual, quick and easy to grow from seed.

    Be aware that Sedges prefer much more moist soil than most grasses.
    Thank you so much! I’ve just had a look at these and wish I had room for all of them! I just love the Foxtail Barley. Wouldn’t that be lovely with a red geum? Thank you so much for your kindness, really appreciated.
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 808
    Amenanthele lessoniana is evergreen and does better with a little shade. Short-lived but self seeds so you can place young plants wherever suits.

    Calamgrostis brachytricha - often seen in Piet Oudolf schemes. Actually, calamagrostis in general as they have a graceful (though fulsome) habit as opposed to the bolt upright form some grasses have.

    Stipa pseudoichu and it's fine and feathery, takes almost no room at the base and wafts above other plants. If happy, it self seeds.
  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,653
    +1 for Luzula nivea.

    Sesleria are good, they are at most a couple of feet in height and spread, look good well into winter (semi-evergreen), can take being cut back and divided, and have nice flower spikes. S. autumnalis has limey green foliage and flowers in late summer, S. nitida has slightly bluish foliage and flowers in spring. Neither are massively showy in their own right really, but fit in well with perennial planting.
  • LesleyHLesleyH Posts: 124
    Amenanthele lessoniana is evergreen and does better with a little shade. Short-lived but self seeds so you can place young plants wherever suits.

    Calamgrostis brachytricha - often seen in Piet Oudolf schemes. Actually, calamagrostis in general as they have a graceful (though fulsome) habit as opposed to the bolt upright form some grasses have.

    Stipa pseudoichu and it's fine and feathery, takes almost no room at the base and wafts above other plants. If happy, it self seeds.
    Thank you, Rachel. These are lovely, all of these would fit right in. Xx
  • LesleyHLesleyH Posts: 124
    Loxley said:
    +1 for Luzula nivea.

    Sesleria are good, they are at most a couple of feet in height and spread, look good well into winter (semi-evergreen), can take being cut back and divided, and have nice flower spikes. S. autumnalis has limey green foliage and flowers in late summer, S. nitida has slightly bluish foliage and flowers in spring. Neither are massively showy in their own right really, but fit in well with perennial planting.
    Loxley, thank you. I really like these! 🙂
  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,418
    You're going to need a bigger garden Lesley  :)
  • LesleyHLesleyH Posts: 124
    AnniD said:
    You're going to need a bigger garden Lesley  :)
    So true, Anni! And it’s a small garden! I have severe arthritis and was finding the garden impossible when I moved here, 2 years ago. The people I hired to help me were not ‘gardeners’ and caused me more stress than pleasure! But I finally found a ‘proper’, experienced and knowledgeable person who has brought such a sense of excitement in me re gardening, I can’t describe! New roses that have arrived this week for him to plant are climbers Jasmina and Sombreuil, then For Your Eyes, Boules De Neige, and Mrs John Laing. Then 5 varieties of lavender plants, some to border a path (the Lavender Garden in Gloucestershire I’ve discovered is wonderful! Lovely healthy plants at such a good, good price). Then there’s also verbena here and salvias! And he is bringing hollyhocks and foxgloves! He’ll be busy tomorrow! Xx
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