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Doctors - prescriptions

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,588
    edited 22 June
    I have high BP controlled by medication and also take Levothyroxine for an under active thyroid. I have to have a blood test every year to check my thyroxine levels in case my medication needs adjusting. They also run tests on the blood taken for kidney function, cholesterol levels and probably some other stuff which might be affected by my meds or my condition. I’m alerted when it’s due by a note in with my prescription and I also get a text asking me to make an appointment with the nurse before my next repeat prescription is due. 

    As I find the BP arm cuff incredibly painful (causing my BP to skyrocket) I do my own BP checks at home twice a year and email them in. 

    It all seems very organised, reasonable and straightforward to me. 

    We are able to contact the GP practice via the website if we think we might need medical attention and the GP phones and decides whether we need to be seen. If we do, an appointment is arranged within the next couple of days or a bit longer if it’s less urgent. OH had a scan within 10 days of first emailing the practice with a possible problem  just a few months ago. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • steveTusteveTu Posts: 1,560
    I've been 'stopped' twice by the pharmacist in the past five years as they wanted to review my use of the drugs I take (post stroke statins and blood thinners). I have only seen my Dr once in that same period, and that was for a completely separate bout of shingles.
    UK - South Coast Retirement Campus (East)
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,588
    Some years ago a friend told me she had been prescribed appetite suppressants when she wanted to lose weight some months after the birth of her baby. Three years later she was still on them. It wasn’t until a new GP joined the practice and checked how the prescribing system worked that it was discovered that the dispenser had just kept doling them out. By then said friend was very slim … so slim her periods had stopped and she had to be weaned off the pills. 

    Having a system in place to stop such things happening are a very good thing. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,277
    My daughter is on long term medication, and has to see the doc regularly. 
    Absolutely right, for the reasons given by @Dovefromabove.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,427
    @Kili   Correct!  Health care is on a percentage reimbursement according to your qualifications, then a "top up" by a private insurance company.   Between 1€ and 1.50€ is payable by the patient including chemist.

    Most patients pay the doctor GP or specialist directly and are reimbursed accordingly directly to their bank account. X-rays, scans and IRMs are paid by the system although now there is a charge of 3euros.

    Dentistry for normal care is the same.  For cosmetic work, crowns, implants, the system pays a minimum and your private insurance covers the rest depending on which formula you have chosen.


    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    Fairygirl said:
    My daughter is on long term medication, and has to see the doc regularly. 
    Absolutely right, for the reasons given by @Dovefromabove.


    I agree with you and Dove.....

    But applying a blanket policy of 4 GP visits a year to everyone whatever their condition is unreasonable, especially when you have to pay for each visit. If I'm forced to go four times a year to my GP and pay £50 a time its going to be cheaper to buy my meds from a UK online pharmacy. and just have a wellman check-up every 3 years

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Greater ManchesterPosts: 832
    Kili said:
    Fire said:
    Maybe in the NHS the timing of reviews depends on the practice you are with.
    Very likely, and also on the medication in question and the reasons you're taking it (whether it's a progressive condition or not). I would hope that GPs are allowed to use some discretion. @Kili - perhaps the reviews are less to do with you and your general health and more to do with the medication and the effects it is known to have on some people taking it - as was the case for me.

    The medication is nothing that serious. Simple Antacids and Ventolin inhalers ( mild asthma). It seems their enforcing this policy on all patients.

    Taking a lot of antacids over a long period can lead to adverse effects.  4 times a year is a bit over-cautious but regular reviews are a good thing. 

    The problem is the charging for GP visits, for some its no problem, for others its an inconvenient extra cost, and for a significant minority it can be a barrier to getting timely treatment for serious illnesses. 
  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 6,533
    I am on life long medication for acid reflux - it's a relatively minor condition but one that caused quite serious problems before it was controlled. Also 'ladies' medication - entirely up to me whether or not to use it.

    I have a standard 1 year GP's review but as my medication is fairly benign my GP is happy to do the review by phone. Asks quite a lot of questions to ensure nothing has changed and always asks if I would like to see him in person as well.

    I don't feel fobbed off by this service and am reassured that my doctor will always see me if necessary. I also feel that somebody is keeping an eye on my well being.

    Before we moved I was on the same medication with a different GP and had no reviews at all in over 5 years.

    That definitely doesn't seem right.

    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • if you have a regular medication then yes the doctor will want to see you every few months.most doctors can't be bothered tho and get very cross at this.and a lot of times receptionists will just put it thru anyway and you will get the meds without.but eventually yes.you will need a review.its a good idea.sometimes they find out that people don't take the meds properly or at the right time.and it's a good way of seeing if elderly people are coping..pharmacists do them too.and they get paid for them.
  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    Topbird said:
    I am on life long medication for acid reflux - it's a relatively minor condition but one that caused quite serious problems before it was controlled. Also 'ladies' medication - entirely up to me whether or not to use it.

    I have a standard 1 year GP's review but as my medication is fairly benign my GP is happy to do the review by phone. Asks quite a lot of questions to ensure nothing has changed and always asks if I would like to see him in person as well.

    I don't feel fobbed off by this service and am reassured that my doctor will always see me if necessary. I also feel that somebody is keeping an eye on my well being.

    Before we moved I was on the same medication with a different GP and had no reviews at all in over 5 years.

    That definitely doesn't seem right.


    Hi Topbird , yes its relatively minor.
    In my case it turned to what's know as Barrettes Oesophagus . I take a high dose of PPI (Proton Pump Inhibitor) at 80mg's a day.

    I spoke with my consultant about this as at first I was worried about the long term effects to which the reply was the effects of not taking it would be worse. However I pressed him on the condition (which is known as a pre cancerous condition) to which he stated I would die of anything other then Barrettes of that he was sure.

    However the long term effects of the PPI's concerns me and I'm hoping to reduce the dose to the minimum. Its made harder by the consultant saying eat what you like it makes no difference because your taking PPI's.

    I'm going to go back to reducing my intake of fatty foods, chocolate etc.. in the hope that I can reduce the dosage of PPI's. Whether a lower dose over time makes a difference I don't know, I hope so. Something to discuss on one of my four enforced visits to my GP  :'(

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

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