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Doctors - prescriptions

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  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    Fire said:
    Maybe in the NHS the timing of reviews depends on the practice you are with.
    Very likely, and also on the medication in question and the reasons you're taking it (whether it's a progressive condition or not). I would hope that GPs are allowed to use some discretion. @Kili - perhaps the reviews are less to do with you and your general health and more to do with the medication and the effects it is known to have on some people taking it - as was the case for me.

    The medication is nothing that serious. Simple Antacids and Ventolin inhalers ( mild asthma). It seems their enforcing this policy on all patients.

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 4,847
    edited 22 June
    I have an annual arthritis review (RA, so blood and urine tests and suchlike to check for any systemic autoimmune stuff that might be going on) even though I no longer take prescription medication for it.
    Being a cynical so-and-so I can't help wondering if such frequent reviews for what sounds like reasonably straightforward prescriptions are at least partly because @Kili 's GP practice can get £50 a time from him (edit: or her. Funny how we have preconceived ideas on things that we actually don't know anything about).
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 11,491
    edited 22 June
    @Kili are you in Ireland?
  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    tui34 said:
    @Kili  I live in France and it is the same policy here.  Every three months for long term medication which, as you, I have mild asthma.  I am in the waiting room longer than the consultation!! (25euros)  Blood pressure, stethoscope and "how are you sleeping?"  If all is ok ...... Outski!!  My GP is pretty available.  If I wish to see a specialist, you cannot be seen under 3 months.  Opthalmologist,  gynaecologist, dermatologist etc.

    tui34, I'm surprised you have to pay. I thought France had a universal health care system free at the point of delivery.

    Yeah that's what I get " How are you"  i'm fine " do you need a prescription" Yes and then where done. What's the point other than the GP can tick that box to say he/she has seen me.

    I did have to visit a GP in Brittany once with the Wife who was ill and he didn't charge us at all. Maybe the paperwork was more trouble than it was worth to him.

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 1,179
    OH and I are both called for medication reviews every 6 months by our GP.
  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    edited 22 June
    Fire said:
    @Kili are you in Ireland?


    No, I had an Irish Father though :D . I was born in the channel islands where I am today.

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    edited 22 June
    JennyJ said:
    I have an annual arthritis review (RA, so blood and urine tests and suchlike to check for any systemic autoimmune stuff that might be going on) even though I no longer take prescription medication for it.
    Being a cynical so-and-so I can't help wondering if such frequent reviews for what sounds like reasonably straightforward prescriptions are at least partly because @Kili 's GP practice can get £50 a time from him (edit: or her. Funny how we have preconceived ideas on things that we actually don't know anything about).


    jennyJ I'm with you on this one. I suspect part of the reason is economic , but its hard to dispute it when they say "Professional guidelines have changed" 

    They don't publish GP's email addresses here, but being in IT for years I've obtained his email address and emailed my GP directly to bypass the bulldogs at reception  :D to ask him what is going on.

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • KiliKili Posts: 758
    edited 22 June
    OH and I are both called for medication reviews every 6 months by our GP.


    Singing Gardener  that makes sense if you have a serious condition, but I don't. I have two conditions there are no cures for and the only option is lifelong medication.
    I understand a GP's need to have a record of seeing a patient at least once a year when prescribing long term, but 4 times a year for what I have makes no sense.

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • GravelEaterGravelEater The East of EnglandPosts: 85
    Where I am it's hard enough to get a doctors appointment to discuss medication, let alone them making an appointment for you.  Medication is supposed to be reviewed, but all too often here, they just sign it off and let the repeats carry on.  A lot of the reviewing (before COVID) was being handled by pharmacists, who may then suggest you see your doctor, and then you can't get an appointment with them :pensive:
  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 1,179
    At my surgery they insist on everyone having a medication review every 6 months. It makes no sense for me as I have Parkinson's and see a consultant and/or Parkinson's nurse regularly anyway. And according to the NICE guidelines GPs aren't supposed to change the prescription without consulting the specialists. When I asked to skip the review because I had only just seen the consultant I was told that unless I had it they would have to stop prescribing my medication. I think NHS GP surgeries get paid for each medication review they do which might be one incentive for them to insist on doing them.

    It makes more sense for OH as he is on medication for high blood pressure and high cholesterol so obviously needs check ups for these on a regular basis.
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