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Cordyline Australis

We've inherited a very large Cordyline Australis, which is now flowering.  Unfortunately, I can't stand the smell of them.  Am I safe to cut the flowers off and will it stop the smell??
I know very little about these plants.  They look lovely but, to me, they stink!!
thank you
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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,645
    I don't like them either - for any reason!
    I'd certainly take the flowers off, but whether that will stop the smell, I'm not sure. They don't have any smell normally, so I expect it would be the flowers causing it.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 6,557
    Doh, where do you live Mrs Jenkins,we love the smell of them,(all along the sea front) hubby is most annoyed,we paid a lot of money for ours and it doesn't smell,can I have a picture please because I can remind us of the smell,ta!
  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 6,557
    Yes it's only the flowers that smell most odd year, normally they would flowers in August
  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 907
    Those round here ( SW UK ) are already in full flower.  I don't know if they are of benefit to our insects as such but if you don't like the scent, it's simple enough to chop off the flower stems and dispose of them. The plants themselves don't smell.
    Interestingly enough, the scent doesn't appear to deter birds from nesting in them whilst in flower :)  
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,177
    I'd remove, the flowers, the leaves, the stems and the roots  :disappointed:
    I think most of them look like mutant bog brushes
    Devon.
  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 907
    Aye but some people like them and as they are freely for sale I doubt whether they are likely to disappear from our gardens any time soon.
    Each of us have our likes and dislikes  -the OP didn't ask about getting rid of the whole plant as such  - just the scent of the flowers which offended him/her so it's easy enough to deal with :)  
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,177
    it's only the flowers which smell. 
    Devon.
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,322
    I don't think you'll do any harm by cutting the flowers off, and it's definitely only the flowers that smell. It is strong! Luckily I love it, but agree it could be overpowering in a smaller space. Always a treat at this time of year for those who enjoy it :smile:
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • didywdidyw East SuffolkPosts: 736
    edited 17 June
    Sorry so many people don't like cordylines!  I planted mine quite a few years ago and it has grown up to be quite structural in the border.  I went and looked at it after reading this and lo and behold - it is flowering!  For something I consider not at all dense it casts quite a rain shadow - the soil below it didn't get any of the heavy rain we had last night. 


    This is just the top.  In this pic you can see the three trunks it has.

  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 907
    Looks good  @didyw :)
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