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Appropriate Tree Planting

We have a small garden, but a neighbouring garden has a large ugly workshop with a metal roof that sits alongside our back fence. We want to grow a tree that would bush out over the fence line to obscure the workshop somewhat, but not take up too much room in the border. The position of the tree would be NNW; there would be no issue about casting shade, either in our garden or our neighbours. Our soil tends to be more acidic. Please can you offer any suggestions? 

Posts

  • B3B3 Posts: 21,514
    Would your neighbour have any objection to a tree overhanging their garden?
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • No, because any overhang would be on the large metal roof. Also, our neighbour has planted trees herself to obscure the side of the workshop (a concrete construction) from the view of her bungalow. We live in a house. 
  • robairdmacraignilrobairdmacraignil CorkPosts: 586
    Maybe a cherry variety might be nice for example Kordia or the black cherry plum. If you shop around for the tree you get you may find one with a better area of bare lower trunk already so you will not have too many lower branches taking up space in your garden and it would save on doing as much pruning to crown lift the tree later on.
  • PlantmindedPlantminded WirralPosts: 1,026
    Hi there, have you considered bamboo?  This will give you good screening if planted and controlled properly.  It's fast growing and adds light and movement, much more attractive than a workshop with a metal roof!  Choose a clumping variety to avoid it becoming a nuisance.  This link should help you:  How to grow bamboo / RHS Gardening

  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 805
    Cotoneaster cornubia may fit the bill.

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 7,736
    I grow bamboo in pots,to screen the rear of a parade of shops,we've always grown the non spreading variety but still don't trust it, so big pots!
  • Thank you everyone for your suggestions; I think the cherry tree is the one we shall go for - planting in early autumn. 
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