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Garden design advice and ideas to resolve my wooden prison (trellis) nightmare!

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  • ElferElfer Posts: 329
    I think you should have started the overall design process before making changes, as is you have kind of boxed yourself in with the shed, trellis, existing plants & path so appreciate that you are starting from a compromised position. Having said that we have all been there and done that so just need to adjust your sites to a reasonable outcome.

    You want to choose plants with different shapes, textures, colours and height. @Loxley has added round shapes in the form of boxus balls & alliums as well as softness, ie grasses scattered around other plants which does break up the harshness of a long garden. Pic is not clear enough for me to see or recognize the other plants so perhaps he will pop in and drop a few more plant names.
  • kawa_starkawa_star Posts: 16
    Elfer said:
    I think you should have started the overall design process before making changes, as is you have kind of boxed yourself in with the shed, trellis, existing plants & path so appreciate that you are starting from a compromised position. Having said that we have all been there and done that so just need to adjust your sites to a reasonable outcome.

    You want to choose plants with different shapes, textures, colours and height. @Loxley has added round shapes in the form of boxus balls & alliums as well as softness, ie grasses scattered around other plants which does break up the harshness of a long garden. Pic is not clear enough for me to see or recognize the other plants so perhaps he will pop in and drop a few more plant names.

    I'd be careful about painting the fence if you hate the trellis on top. A dark colour will make the fence recede but since you can't paint the trellis this would stand out even more. If you want to paint the fence, a brighter colour might be better to make a feature of it and draw your eye away from the trellis.
    Might be best to leave it and concentrate on the planting.

    Putting in a focal point such as a water feature would also help draw away your attention from the fencing.
    So the trellis is actually ours, we used it to hide his home made one as shown in this message 

    I'm liking the idea of a water feature, I don't suppose you have any nice simple ideas 😁 we have the space in front of the garden room calling for something 
    Elfer said:
    I think you should have started the overall design process before making changes, as is you have kind of boxed yourself in with the shed, trellis, existing plants & path so appreciate that you are starting from a compromised position. Having said that we have all been there and done that so just need to adjust your sites to a reasonable outcome.

    You want to choose plants with different shapes, textures, colours and height. @Loxley has added round shapes in the form of boxus balls & alliums as well as softness, ie grasses scattered around other plants which does break up the harshness of a long garden. Pic is not clear enough for me to see or recognize the other plants so perhaps he will pop in and drop a few more plant names.
  • Mind you if I were the neighbours I'd be more offended by the trampoline 😂

    It's so tough trying to change the feel when so much of it is now taken over by immovable features. If it was my space I'd find some way to cut into the lawn from the left hand side and widen that bed and add lost of texture and a bit of height to divide the space a bit. As currently the eye is drawn to that summer house and compressing the view. Anything that goes against the Great British obsession with skinny borders against a fence is an improvement.

    Adding to all this I'd also suggest patience as no garden is perfect and we all keep refining and try out plants to see what works with the microclimate. Try a bunch of plants that would in theory enjoy the positioning and see how you feel about them in a year's time. Lots of good offers on smaller 9cm pots that can help not make it a very expensive trial and maybe add a few mature plants you're certain about to add some impact. And have fun with it... don't just see it as an imposition by a neighbour. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • You've made a great start considering you're new parents in a new home, it looks like you have the makings of a lovely garden. Don't worry about things out of your control i.e. the fence, great opportunity for climbers such as clematis, honeysuckle, Akebia (spicy vanilla fragrance). I noticed you have what looks like a coldframe/mini greenhouse so you could sow seeds of biennials for next year - if you have time it's a cheap way of getting lots of plants. In front of the summer house I would go for wispy grasses like Stipa, interspersed with foxgloves, lupins, verbena b. etc.

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 8,717
    I love Honeysuckles but along with foxgloves lupins poisonous,if you have toddlers who put everything in their mouth
  • kawa_starkawa_star Posts: 16
    I love Honeysuckles but along with foxgloves lupins poisonous,if you have toddlers who put everything in their mouth
    Oh gosh, I have lupins 🙈 
  • kawa_starkawa_star Posts: 16
    You've made a great start considering you're new parents in a new home, it looks like you have the makings of a lovely garden. Don't worry about things out of your control i.e. the fence, great opportunity for climbers such as clematis, honeysuckle, Akebia (spicy vanilla fragrance). I noticed you have what looks like a coldframe/mini greenhouse so you could sow seeds of biennials for next year - if you have time it's a cheap way of getting lots of plants. In front of the summer house I would go for wispy grasses like Stipa, interspersed with foxgloves, lupins, verbena b. etc.

    Thank you that's really helpful. I'm writing down all of these ideas 😍
  • kawa_starkawa_star Posts: 16
    Mind you if I were the neighbours I'd be more offended by the trampoline 😂

    It's so tough trying to change the feel when so much of it is now taken over by immovable features. If it was my space I'd find some way to cut into the lawn from the left hand side and widen that bed and add lost of texture and a bit of height to divide the space a bit. As currently the eye is drawn to that summer house and compressing the view. Anything that goes against the Great British obsession with skinny borders against a fence is an improvement.

    Adding to all this I'd also suggest patience as no garden is perfect and we all keep refining and try out plants to see what works with the microclimate. Try a bunch of plants that would in theory enjoy the positioning and see how you feel about them in a year's time. Lots of good offers on smaller 9cm pots that can help not make it a very expensive trial and maybe add a few mature plants you're certain about to add some impact. And have fun with it... don't just see it as an imposition by a neighbour. 
    I'm planning a little bed there on thst corner. Wlive also planted an apple tree in front of summer house. I'm just struggling with what else to plant, so am saving all these ideas
  • FireFire Posts: 18,966
    Crab apple trees; rowan; a medium sized, very tolerant acer might be good.  
  • Flora rosaFlora rosa Posts: 262
    Er, really. He isn't allowed to do that! What an outrage! it's well above regulations and I know cos OH is a town planner. I would contact the council. BUT I know it's so difficult with neighbours 😫. Widening the bed, tall planting, trellis and climbers would be my plan. (After contacting council lol) 
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