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Over-pruned mop head hydrangea? No flowers

I bought a mop head hydrangea last year. I read that in early spring it should be pruned, so I cut it back a little - I cut down to a new set a buds. I didn’t cut much…. However it now hasn’t got any flower buds on it whereas my other, older, hydrangea does. 

Did I over prune? Will it not flower this year…? :(

Posts

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 9,672
    Even my established hydrangea is only just showing flower buds due to the dreadful Spring weather. It doesn't sound like you over pruned. Any chance of a photo perhaps? 
    Have you fed it at all ?
  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 2,302
    edited June 2021
    You potentially have done. Macrophylla hydrangeas flower on existing growth. The only ones to prune hard in late spring is paniculata cultivars that grow flowers in the fresh growth. For macrophyllas you leave the flowers on all winter to protect a bit the fresh growth as it comes through and it's a good reminder to not overprune, all is needed is removing the spent flowers.

    We've all made similar mistakes at some point, you won't repeat it 😉

    But I agree with AnniD both my paniculata and macrophylla ones have barely set flower heads at this stage. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,946
    Mine haven’t got any buds yet either, they’re a late flowering shrub, give them time. You’ve done right by just cutting down to the next set of buds. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Thanks all. I suspect I have indeed made an error! Perhaps those YouTube videos I watched were directed at more mature hydrangea plants. 

    @Lyn I understand your point but isn’t it odd that my two other hydrangea have flower buds and this one doesn’t ?

    I will try and post a picture this afternoon. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,450
    They don't all produce buds and flower at exactly the same time.  :)
    I think mine will be very late this year. They're only just recovering from the frost damage, and the foliage at the top of the stems is still tiny. The foliage lower down is ok though. 
    Even my oak leaf hydrangeas have been struggling a bit, having quite a lot of damaged stems. I don't normally prune them at all, other than to remove spent heads or any crossing branches. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks @Fairygirl - I hope you’re right!

    Do you feed your hydrangeas? Is it necessary?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,450
    I don't feed mine. I feed the soil by adding compost each year, so the shrubs generally get nothing. They might get a bit of B,F&B in spring if I can be bothered, or if other planting nearby is getting some. 
    I sometimes give young shrubs a seaweed feed, but I prefer to grow my plants harder. Makes them more robust. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    I don't feed mine. I feed the soil by adding compost each year, so the shrubs generally get nothing. They might get a bit of B,F&B in spring if I can be bothered, or if other planting nearby is getting some. 
    I sometimes give young shrubs a seaweed feed, but I prefer to grow my plants harder. Makes them more robust. 
    Perfect - no feeding it is!
  • A bud! It’s tiny and only one but it’s still a bud :) 


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,946
    It looks very healthy, if you don’t get anymore flowers this year it will definitely perform well next. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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