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Low maintenance architectural

stevekingZLokcpkqstevekingZLokcpkq Hemel HempsteadPosts: 10
Hello, I have just bought 2 x planters (2.4 metres x 500mm x 500mm) to sit on my patio, it gets about 5 hours of sun a day and is quite exposed to wind. I want to plant something no more than 600mm high - evergreen. I have looked at all sorts - dwarf bamboo to yew, just wondered if anyone had any ideas for this.

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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869
    Hi again Steve
    I've just bought some pittosporum golf ball to go around my drive.
    They naturally grow to about 1m round balls in time, but can be trimmed smaller.
    A property round the corner has a mix of pittosporum Tom Thumb and Photinia Little red robin (both trimmed into round balls about 1m across) which also looks good as they both have some red in them

    I's sure you'll get plenty of other ideas here too.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135
    Limiting the height could make it hard to get suggestions, as most shrubs will need some pruning to maintain that size, but Hebes will do fine there. There are hundreds of varieties though, so just check general sizes and growth habits first. Vernicosa is a good, well shaped type, that doesn't get enormous. A light trim after flowering will keep it smart. 
    Eounymous fortunei will also work, but they grow in a more natural shape. You can trim them to shape if you want a more formal look. There are quite a lot of varieties of those too, but they're not terribly exciting. Mainly used as a foil for other plants, so you could always add spring bulbs if you want it to be brighter, and some annuals for summer, depending on your preferences.  
    Dwarf Azaleas would also work - many stay quite neat even after many years. Just be careful that you pick the right ones though - some are deciduous and much bigger, and fill the containers with a suitable soil. It's the Japanese types [japonica] which are neat and slower growing. There's always a bit of confusion around Rhodos and Azaleas.  You don't want any giant Rhododendrons  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ElferElfer Posts: 329
    Laurel cone, Hebe rakaiensis, Picea glauca, Cordyline (won't like the cold though).
  • stevekingZLokcpkqstevekingZLokcpkq Hemel HempsteadPosts: 10
    Thanks all, I will check out all of your suggestions as I hadn't thought of many of these.
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