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Container size for hydrangea seemanni

Hello,

I would like (have no choice but) to plant a hydrangea seemanni into a container. 

I would like to choose a container that will be the right size to accommodate it for life. 

Would someone please let me know the minimum dimensions required for the container; and just in case, the minimum volume (in litres) of the container. 

Many thanks and best wishes,

Meds

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,777
    Put simply - it would need to be huge. They get to a very considerable size. 
    They aren't completely hardy everywhere either, and in a container would be more vulnerable to low temps, so you would need to be vigilant with that.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • mrmailingsmrmailings Posts: 3
    Fairygirl said:
    Put simply - it would need to be huge. They get to a very considerable size. 
    They aren't completely hardy everywhere either, and in a container would be more vulnerable to low temps, so you would need to be vigilant with that.  :)
    If you could quantify “huge” it would make it possible for me to search online for a suitable container :smile:
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,777
    I just don't think any container you could buy would be big enough. Better to build one if you can't plant in the ground.
    It would need to be at least a metre long and around 60 cm depth and height. Even then, it may not be substantial enough. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,284
    It's a climber that can cope with any aspect as long as it's sheltered from extreme cold and winds and you give it some support.  It will need a large, deep container to allow you to keep its soil moist but not soggy and also big enough not to freeze solid as they are not reliable hardy and won't enjoy having cold feet.    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/8951/Hydrangea-seemannii/Details 

    If you can give it good quality compost such as John Innes no 3 mixed with about 25% MPC for moisture retention a 75 to 90cm wide and deep pot should be fine.  Keep it watered all thru the growing season, feed it every spring with slow release fertiliser and mulch the top with expanded clay pellets, chipped bark or something similar to keep down weeds and retain moisture.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • ciaranmcgreneraciaranmcgrenera Posts: 105
    Obelixx said:
    It's a climber that can cope with any aspect as long as it's sheltered from extreme cold and winds and you give it some support.  It will need a large, deep container to allow you to keep its soil moist but not soggy and also big enough not to freeze solid as they are not reliable hardy and won't enjoy having cold feet.    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/8951/Hydrangea-seemannii/Details 

    If you can give it good quality compost such as John Innes no 3 mixed with about 25% MPC for moisture retention a 75 to 90cm wide and deep pot should be fine.  Keep it watered all thru the growing season, feed it every spring with slow release fertiliser and mulch the top with expanded clay pellets, chipped bark or something similar to keep down weeds and retain moisture.
    Oh dear, I have a large north facing concrete patio and like OP have no choice but to populate it with pots. I have just planted one of these in a 50cm container. Might have to reconsider!
  • mrmailingsmrmailings Posts: 3
    Obelixx said:
    It's a climber that can cope with any aspect as long as it's sheltered from extreme cold and winds and you give it some support.  It will need a large, deep container to allow you to keep its soil moist but not soggy and also big enough not to freeze solid as they are not reliable hardy and won't enjoy having cold feet.    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/8951/Hydrangea-seemannii/Details 

    If you can give it good quality compost such as John Innes no 3 mixed with about 25% MPC for moisture retention a 75 to 90cm wide and deep pot should be fine.  Keep it watered all thru the growing season, feed it every spring with slow release fertiliser and mulch the top with expanded clay pellets, chipped bark or something similar to keep down weeds and retain moisture.
    Oh dear, I have a large north facing concrete patio and like OP have no choice but to populate it with pots. I have just planted one of these in a 50cm container. Might have to reconsider!
    I have spent hours online reading site after site for guidance. With rare exception, they are all utterly frustrating should you be a novice. 

    Eg ‘You will need a large/huge/appropriately sized etc pot’.  

    I gather 60cm width is a minimum. You may indeed have to reconsider your 50cm pot.  

    I have absolutely no idea of depth requirements.  

    I have been looking for a 60cm or 70cm squared plastic planter online; but no success. 

    I’m grateful to Obelixx for the detail in their guidance.  
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,777
    As a general guide - look at the eventual approximate eventual size of the plant. That gives you an idea of the capacity needed for the root system  :)
    Any plant - shrub or climber - which is eventually going to be ten feet/3 metres or more in size, will have a substantial root size. A pot which is only around 2 feet or so in diameter [and around the same in depth] will rarely be enough to accommodate a plant that size apart from the first few years, because the root system will take up quite a bit of the room available in the container, at the expense of the growing medium. After that, it either needs to go in the ground, or it needs pruning to keep it at a more manageable size. It often defeats the object of having a potentially large climber if it's constantly being hacked back. 
    Anything potted is totally reliant on you for it's welfare. The soil medium is very important, as well as drainage and nutrition. Many people make the mistake of thinking compost is fine for them, but they need a soil based medium. Compost is only of use for a season as it doesn't have enough heart for longer term planting.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,284
    @Fairygirl is absolutely right.  After a while it will need pruning or re-potting and the planting medium/compost is key.   Fibrous MPC won't do and you will have to feed and water for all its needs.   

    You could always consider it as a temporary plant that will give pleasure for a few years and get rid to a new home - Freecycle or a community garden - when it does get too big or starts to fail because of lack of root run or, should you move, take it with you and plant it out. 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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