Forum home Plants

How to revive these sad-looking plants?

Shoxt3rShoxt3r Posts: 188
Hi there,

While watering the garden I spotted these rather sad-looking plants. Is there anything I can do to revive them again?

The first is a grass, while the second is a Erysimum. I am guessing that the frost has got to them?





Thanks in advance!

Andrew

Posts

  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 2,429
    You can comb out the dead growth in your grass altho if you are still expecting frosts, may be a good idea to leave it for a while.  The dead bits often offer some protection to the new ( perhaps invisible ) growth,
  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 2,507
    Are they worth the bother?
    You can take cuttings from the Bowles mauve wallflower but they arent long lived plants and end up very ungainly and woody.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 7,703
    I agree, the Bowles Mauve is past its best. I think I would try a light trim back on part of the plant to encourage some non-flowering shoots to take as cuttings.
  • Shoxt3rShoxt3r Posts: 188
    You can comb out the dead growth in your grass altho if you are still expecting frosts, may be a good idea to leave it for a while.  The dead bits often offer some protection to the new ( perhaps invisible ) growth,
    Thanks - I was hoping that the grass was salvageable as we've had it a few years now and it's normally been pretty hardy. We'll comb out the dead growth once the last frost passes in that case which hopefully won't be too far away!
    K67 said:
    Are they worth the bother?
    You can take cuttings from the Bowles mauve wallflower but they arent long lived plants and end up very ungainly and woody.
    We'd like to keep the grass if at all possible as it's a nice "sensory" plant for our daughter but sounds like the Bowles Mauve (didn't know it was known as that!) is well past it...
    JennyJ said:
    I agree, the Bowles Mauve is past its best. I think I would try a light trim back on part of the plant to encourage some non-flowering shoots to take as cuttings.
    Ok thank you, we'll maybe have a look at trimming it back and taking some cuttings as we've had some success with this in the past with skimmias.

    Can anyone recommend a suitable replacement that would be quite happy in a pot, or would it be best just to put bedding plants/seeds in it instead and just keep refreshing them each year?
  • PianoplayerPianoplayer Posts: 624
    How about a scented pelargonium for the pot? That would be good sensory plant, too - all sorts of different scents available! They work well in pots, but need sun, and will need a frost-free place for overwintering.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 7,703
    One of the smaller kinds of lavender would also be good in the pot.
  • CamelliadCamelliad SussexPosts: 402
    Bunnys tail grass (lagurus ovatus) is also a lovely sensory annual grass to grow in pots. Very easy to grow from seed.
Sign In or Register to comment.