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Grape Vine advice

rkotrkot Posts: 4
I have recently moved house and the previous owner had this grape vine. I have no idea about things like this but would like to learn. It appears overgrown and in need of some care but I havent the first idea on where to start. Can anyone recommend the best course of action and when it should be done.

Thanks :smile:



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Posts

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 5,147
    I do have and have had grapevines difficult to say from a picture.do the neighbours know anything about it.
  • steephillsteephill Posts: 1,789
    It is too late in the year to do any major pruning you might want to do. I would concentrate on just trying to keep it under control and see what grapes you get. Simple maintenance pruning would mean cutting back any fruiting shoots to two buds beyond the final bunch on the shoot. You can prune back non-fruiting shoots much harder, back to a bud or two up from any bigger branch. You should also limit the number of bunches of fruit the vine carries and ideally thin out the number of grapes in any bunches you keep.
    Next Winter once it is dormant you could cut it back much harder. Take it back to where the wooden fence starts and you have two main branches. Get rid of the useless trellis and put up a proper wire support framework using the fence posts. You will get new shoots coming up and it is these you want to train to give you new fruiting shoots. Look up Guyot system for vines and you should find lots of info.

  • tuikowhai34tuikowhai34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 973
    Hi and Welcome to the forum.

    It certainly needs a good prune.  I think someone expert in the English climate will advise if you are in time to prune it now.   Mine are pruned right back during winter.  If you are still in time to prune - lop off old wood and keep the new Do you know if they are eating grapes and what variety?


    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • tuikowhai34tuikowhai34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 973
    They go like the clappers in the summer! So don't worry about taking too much wood off. 


    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • rkotrkot Posts: 4
    steephill said:
    It is too late in the year to do any major pruning you might want to do. I would concentrate on just trying to keep it under control and see what grapes you get. Simple maintenance pruning would mean cutting back any fruiting shoots to two buds beyond the final bunch on the shoot. You can prune back non-fruiting shoots much harder, back to a bud or two up from any bigger branch. You should also limit the number of bunches of fruit the vine carries and ideally thin out the number of grapes in any bunches you keep.
    Next Winter once it is dormant you could cut it back much harder. Take it back to where the wooden fence starts and you have two main branches. Get rid of the useless trellis and put up a proper wire support framework using the fence posts. You will get new shoots coming up and it is these you want to train to give you new fruiting shoots. Look up Guyot system for vines and you should find lots of info.

    This is helpful thank you. When cutting it should I just saw it off from the trunk and leave it until the spring or should I be leaving any of the newer wood? 
  • rkotrkot Posts: 4
    Hi and Welcome to the forum.

    It certainly needs a good prune.  I think someone expert in the English climate will advise if you are in time to prune it now.   Mine are pruned right back during winter.  If you are still in time to prune - lop off old wood and keep the new Do you know if they are eating grapes and what variety?


    I have no idea on the variety unfortunately. I would have thought they would be eating grapes but not sure. If I were to cut mine down that low I wouldn't have any new wood. Do you think this will matter?
  • tuikowhai34tuikowhai34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 973
    New wood comes every year from the notches that you see on the remaining branch(es).  It is so dense in the summer, that I have to lop off the ends or the fruit won't be ripe, as too much shade.  This is the way the vintners prune the vines here.  It's drastic, but by golly, doesn't make any difference to the growth.  The vines are stronger for it.  Best to have 2 or 3 good bunches of grapes that ripen, than lots of bunches that remain green.  @steephill has given you some excellent advice.
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • tuikowhai34tuikowhai34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 973
    PS.  I would be inclined (next winter) to lop off all the crappy stuff going to the left and concentrate having a nice upright vine.  Then maybe branch out to the left and right the following years.  You can't kill them.  They like couch grass!
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • EustaceEustace Posts: 212
    As the buds have started opening, I think you should wait until winter to do any pruning.
  • bertrand-mabelbertrand-mabel Posts: 618
    No don't do anything until you see what the vines do.
    We have outdoor and greenhouse vines and these are cut back as required in the late winter.
    The vines are now showing new growths and any that are  down the stems are rubbed out and the rest are allowed to grow and produce the grapes which we make wine from and/or eat.
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