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  • HazybHazyb Posts: 329
    You would be surprised at what you can grow in a north facing border of it is bright enough rather than sunny. 

    Mine doesn’t get much sun at all until June/July /august and those Plants closest to the fence receive the least amount of sun.  My border would be 1.5m wide roughly. 

    I grow . Astibles, Astrantia rose . Agastache, penstemon garnet. Geranium, foxgloves up against the fence , geum, lynchis coronaria, aquilegia, catmint, huechera, sedum, hakonchloa grass and snapdragons. 

    This year I have a couple of delphiniums growing too. 

    Heuchera will give you colour all year round and my pentstemons kept their greenery all winter. 

    If you avoid the obvious sun worshipers you can experiment a bit more to see what works.  I have been pleasantly surprised at what I have been able to grow. 
  • delskidelski Posts: 273
    Welcome we only do kind words on here.
    Disagree. Pretty sure nobody on the forum wants me to waste time posting/quoting posts to prove otherwise.
  • Songbird-1Songbird-1 Posts: 2,983
    @KCMM09  and welcome. We grew some beautiful White Phlox in our old North facing house. They spread somewhat over the years but the new seedlings can be pulled out easily enough if you don't want them, The flowers are long lasting and smell delicious. Luckily, when we moved, we took some small seedlings for our new garden and Im glad we did, as we can only find pink ones now, which, in our opinion, are not as nice looking or striking to look at as the white ones.
  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    Obelixx said:
    Climbers.  That left hand fence is just asking to have climbers to extend the season of interest?  As the fence posts are on our side that would indicate the fence is yours so you could easily fix vine eyes to the posts at 30cm interval and then tension wires between them.  It's a cheap and unobtrusive way to provide support for a repeat flowering rambling rose such as Albéric Barbier (white) or Phyllis Bide (pink).   There are plenty of climbing roses that would do too. 

    Clematis would be another possibility to plant on its own or to mingle with the rose and I would advise a viticella as they are robust, come in many forms and colours and are easy to prune and care for once established.  Betty Corning is a good one - http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=562
    as is Black prince - http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=87
    or Hagelby Pink - http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=3206
    Etoile rose would be good at the sunnier end of the fence - http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=526 

    If you are allowed to attach supports such as wires, that wall at the bottom is asking for a lovely repeat flowering rose or a fan-trained blackberry or tayberry.

    Other than that there are loads of hardy geraniums, geums, astrantias that would cope with being north facing and give you a long season of flowering interest without swamping your dwarf conifers.
    Thanks so much for this reply it’s so helpful! 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,253
    edited 4 May
    Pleasure.  I love a good clematis tho I avoid the evergreens and montanas - too often thuggish and a short flowering season.

    You could probably twine a perfumed rambling rose around that arbour/seating area in the corner too.   David Austin have some well perfumed, repeat flowering ramblers that would enjoy that spot.  

    A white phlox, as @Songbird-1 suggests, will light up the more shaded areas, as will any white or cream flowered plant but you can go for stronger colours at the sunnier end.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    Obelixx said:
    Pleasure.  I love a good clematis tho I avoid the evergreens and montanas - too often thuggish and a short flowering season.

    You could probably twine a perfumed rambling rose around that arbour/seating area in the corner too.   David Austin have some well perfumed, repeat flowering ramblers that would enjoy that spot.  

    A white phlox, as @Songbird-1 suggests, will light up the more shaded areas, as will any white or cream flowered plant but you can go for stronger colours at the sunnier end.
    When clematis are established will they always go back to ground level? The one I planted last year naturally deteriorated then I cut back as it needed. But I’ve seen other homes
    with clematis structures year round. 

    Do you know if any white or pink ones that would tolerate the shade in the corner behind the arbour ? 

    I wasn’t sure if a rose would suit, DA advised I didn’t plant the roses I have, the way I have but so far they’re doing well! 

    I think I’ve seen white phlox in my local GC so I’ll take a look ! 

    Thanks 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,253
    Clematis fall into 3 main groups.

    1.  No pruning at all except to tidy up, keep in bounds or, occasionally, remove whole stems to renew vigour once flowering finishes usually by March/April.  This group includes the evergreens, cirrhosas and so on.
    2. Flower in late May/June on last year's stems but can be hit by frosts so in April you can remove dead twiggy bits to tidy them up but the general pruning is done when flowering is over again to remove a stem or two to renew vigour and keep in bunds.  Dead-heading and a good feed will encourage a second bloom in late summer.
    3. Cut back hard in March, remove all the dead twiggy bits and give a generous feed and they produce lots of new stems that flower the same year. 

    The key with clematis is to plant them deep to encourage new shoots, give them rich, improved soil, mulch and feed every spring (like roses) and make sure they do not go thirsty in hot dry spells.

    You can use the clematis website I gave you to search for suitable clematis by colour, aspect, flowering time, size but, for beginners, I recommend the viticellas as being the most reliable and easy to prune.   Just remember to keep a vigilant eye on new growth on any clematis and train or tie it in as you want before it becomes an impossible tangle.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • KiliKili Posts: 715
    edited 5 May
    I would put a meandering path right up the middle of the lawn to your shed and arbour, then remove the lawn altogether and expand your beds and plant some plants with height to hide the view at the back so you meander through taller plants up the path to the back giving an impression of a larger garden with hidden spaces which will allow you to grow a whole lot more, unless of course you have young children who will need the lawn for play.

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    Thanks @Obelixx that’s a massive help, I wish I could have you as my personal gardener 😂 ! 
     
    @Kili yes we want to keep the lawn for children to play
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 4,418
    edited 5 May
    For cottagey perennials to put under/in front of your clematis and roses, have a look at hardy geraniums. Most will take some shade and come in many heights from ground cover to 3 or four foot billowy mounds so you probably want to look at the smaller ones, and they come in white and both pale and deep pinks as well as blues/mauves. My new one this year is Salome, not flowering yet of course but I have high hopes https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/91735/Geranium-Salome/Details
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