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Hydrangea not Growing

Is anyone able to advise me as to why my two hydrangeas it the corners of my Garden wall are both stunted, they flower ok but only with small flowers, but the are not growing or are growing very slowly, could it be because they are cuttings from a Hydrangea and too many cutting have been taken from the original plant ?? 

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 13,014
    Nothing to do with number of cuttings.
    Much more likely to be lack of water, they are very thirsty plants.
    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.
  • punkdoc said:
    Nothing to do with number of cuttings.
    Much more likely to be lack of water, they are very thirsty plants.
    they get plenty of water, but not much happens with them, they are both about a foot high but don’t seem to want to grow any further, they get plenty of sunlight where they are too 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,918
    Shade and moisture is what they need. If they have enough moisture they can cope with more sun, but it doesn't sound as if their location is ideal. Walls create very dry areas at their base. Do you mean they're planted inside a walled structure? That would tend to be dry too.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    Shade and moisture is what they need. If they have enough moisture they can cope with more sun, but it doesn't sound as if their location is ideal. Walls create very dry areas at their base. Do you mean they're planted inside a walled structure? That would tend to be dry too.
    planted in the corners of the garden wall, when the hydrangeas were planted in the corner of the house and garden wall they were ok, since I have moved them the problem started 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,918
    I think we'd need more info and a photo, but it sounds as if they haven't established well after moving. 
    When moving any established shrub, it's important to give them as little stress as possible. Cut them back, thoroughly water them, dig out with a big rootball, ensure a well prepped new planting hole and then give copious watering afterwards, especially if it's done during drier months. A mulch will also help with moisture retention after they're well soaked. Bark or just more compost is ideal. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    I think we'd need more info and a photo, but it sounds as if they haven't established well after moving. 
    When moving any established shrub, it's important to give them as little stress as possible. Cut them back, thoroughly water them, dig out with a big rootball, ensure a well prepped new planting hole and then give copious watering afterwards, especially if it's done during drier months. A mulch will also help with moisture retention after they're well soaked. Bark or just more compost is ideal. 
    Have weed surpressing material on top of the earth round the plant and pebbles on top of that to try to stop evaporation of the watering so I will try giving them more water

  • ElferElfer Posts: 329
    Hydrangeas come in all shapes and size, some are quite small (70cm) with small flowers. Do you know the specific type?
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