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Planting hole: manure or FBB or both

DedekindDedekind Posts: 168
When preparing a planting hole, I know it depends on the plant, but more or less generally I've read various advices as to how to fill it, ideally with a mix of soil and garden compost or well rotted manure. Also read we add things like blood fish and bone to the hole. 

Is that overkill? I have FBB and I don't have manure (but can easily get it bagged if it will be better). My soil is clay at the bottom by the way, top few inches are better. 

I guess my question is whether I should be using both things in the planting hole or just one would be ok
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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,564
    I think the current thinking is NOT to add anything to the hole. 
    The theory is that it makes the roots search out for food, rather than settle into the planting hole and just sit there.
    Devon.
  • DedekindDedekind Posts: 168
    Hmm that's good thinking. Last year I was even more novice than this year and didn't put anything, most plants are doing fine.. maybe I'm just reading too much information 
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,564
    Dedekind said:
    Hmm that's good thinking. Last year I was even more novice than this year and didn't put anything, most plants are doing fine.. maybe I'm just reading too much information 

    It's easy , and understandable to "overthink" things when you're starting off. 
    Devon.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    The best approach is to improve the soil in the whole area before planting.  If that's not possible (as it won't be in established borders etc.) then an autumn mulch of a 5cm+ deep layer of well-rotted manure or home-made compost + FBB works wonders.  The worms and other soil organisms will take it down and process it into perfect plant food for you, as well as improving the general soil drainage. 
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,858
    I absolutely agree with the above comments,  don’t put anything down the hole, see first how the plants are growing, I’ve never used anything other than home made compost. 
    When your souls in good condition the plants will grow. 
    Of course, if you move to a new house where the gardens been neglected for years you may need something to help it.
    when we took out a huge old conifer hedge I just used chicken pellets and compost.  You can’t get better than that border.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • B3B3 Posts: 21,406
    If you have foxes, don't use FBB when you get around to fertilising. They'll dig up anything you've planted.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • I use FBB when I remember but to be honest I haven't noticed much difference when I've added nothing. I try to stick to " right plant, right place" then mulch with compost or manure or a mix of both. 
    I certainly don't prescribe to products like mycorrhizal fungi, which personally I think is a waste of money. ( Monty Don is a big fan however?)
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,564
    I use FBB when I remember but to be honest I haven't noticed much difference when I've added nothing. I try to stick to " right plant, right place" then mulch with compost or manure or a mix of both. 
    I certainly don't prescribe to products like mycorrhizal fungi, which personally I think is a waste of money. ( Monty Don is a big fan however?)
    I couldn't agree more.
    IMHO "Emperor's New Clothes" and just a way of sucking money out of gullible consumers.
     Unless your soil has come from bottom of a mine shaft, it'll be rammed with M fungi already.
    Devon.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,038
    Hostafan1 said:
    ...
     Unless your soil has come from bottom of a mine shaft, it'll be rammed with M fungi already.
    There's a new-ish housing estate near here on what was the pit top, so that's certainly a possible scenario for some people. I'm told that long ago there was a sand quarry where we are. I'm sure there are some mycorrhizal fungi here and my long-term addition of homemade compost will be helping, but I do use a sprinkling of the packet fungi on the roots when I plant a tree or shrub (not for herbaceous though).






  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,564
    JennyJ said:
    Hostafan1 said:
    ...
     Unless your soil has come from bottom of a mine shaft, it'll be rammed with M fungi already.
    There's a new-ish housing estate near here on what was the pit top, so that's certainly a possible scenario for some people. I'm told that long ago there was a sand quarry where we are. I'm sure there are some mycorrhizal fungi here and my long-term addition of homemade compost will be helping, but I do use a sprinkling of the packet fungi on the roots when I plant a tree or shrub (not for herbaceous though).


    I can see no reason why MD is using it in HIS garden
    Has anyone seen any properly conducted experiments to  establish if identical plants put in identical soil benefit from it?
    I've not seen any.




    Devon.
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