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Plant id. Looks like a forsythia but not?

Hi this is stunning it’s the brightest yellow and it has feathery green leaves. It looks like a forsythia but not your average one. Anyone have any idea? Prob not the best picture to see the foliage

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,600
    can't see the pic
    Devon.
  • karajanebateskarajanebates Posts: 24
    edited April 2021
    Hostafan1 said:
    can't see the pic
    Sorry it was too large. Here it is
  • TackTack Central South UKPosts: 888
    A Mimosa?

  • HeliosHelios Posts: 186
    I’d say mimosa too. Lovely feathery foliage.
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 1,965
    Definitely Mimosa.  Beautiful tree.

    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • karajanebateskarajanebates Posts: 24
    edited April 2021
    that’s it you lovely lot Thankyou!!I’d waste my life trying to find it with internet searches! Thankyou all so much xx
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,579
    Just a word of warning.  We have inherited 2 here in this garden, both large and unloved.   They flower early in the year and look good for a couple of weeks but then the flowers turn brown and they look pretty tatty for several more weeks. 

    They sucker and are also generous with seedlings which can be hard to pull if you ignore them for a year.  Not a good choice for a small garden.

    We have lifted the crown on both of ours to let light in below and now keep them clear below but it was a big job to do and they need constant vigilance.  One is where we can mow so is not too bad but the other is along the boundary with our farmer neighbours in a strip the previous owners with "weed suppressing" membrane.  It doesn't and I still find babies coming up around it and suckers popping up in the polytunnel and fruit beds we now have in front of it.

    Before:

    The year after:

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • karajanebateskarajanebates Posts: 24
    edited April 2021
    Obelixx said:
    Just a word of warning.  We have inherited 2 here in this garden, both large and unloved.   They flower early in the year and look good for a couple of weeks but then the flowers turn brown and they look pretty tatty for several more weeks. 

    They sucker and are also generous with seedlings which can be hard to pull if you ignore them for a year.  Not a good choice for a small garden.

    We have lifted the crown on both of ours to let light in below and now keep them clear below but it was a big job to do and they need constant vigilance.  One is where we can mow so is not too bad but the other is along the boundary with our farmer neighbours in a strip the previous owners with "weed suppressing" membrane.  It doesn't and I still find babies coming up around it and suckers popping up in the polytunnel and fruit beds we now have in front of it.

    Before:

    The year after:

    Oh bless you Thankyou I was showing my mum and she was concerned about seeds and the kids/dog invasive etc! My excitement to have one although short lived is still high as I have learnt another tree and I can admire it in the church yard still  Xx you have done a great job with yours tho it does look amazing !
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,579
    Thanks.  I sawed and OH did the heavy lifting to shift it all then took out the undergrowth with his strimmer.

    Definitely a good idea to carry on admiring the one in the churchyard.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,623
    Friends dug up a mimosa sapling from the side of the road and planted it in their garden. Mistake! Four year’s later they had to dig the huge beast and it’s many offspring up. Probably less invasive in the UK, here it grows like a weed, nevertheless, I agree with @Obelixx, admire from afar!
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