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Plant ideas for morning sun/afternoon shade

Afternoon everyone.  We’ve recently had our front garden done and I’d like some plants in large pots.  The site is east facing and gets full sun from sunrise til about 2.30pm.  Would hostas be happy in that situation?  If not, can anyone suggest an alternative.  Wildlife friendly would be preferable.  Thanks in advance. 

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,551
    Hostas are herbaceous perennials so they disappear for up to 6 months of the year and are prone to munching by slugs and snails.  They are mostly grown for their foliage and many people remove the flowers tho they are attractive to some pollinators.

    For easy care and a plant of stature, have a look at viburnum tinus "lisarose" which has flowers thru winter and early spring and is valuable to pollinators out and about at that time when flowers are scarce - https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/302763/Viburnum-tinus-Lisarose-(PBR)/Details

    For a smaller shrub with flowers in late spring/early summer, try https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/138697/Hebe-Pink-Elephant-(v)/Details or https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/94166/Hebe-Pewter-Dome/Details and many more available

    Hardy, upright fuchsias such as Tom Thumb or Mrs WP Wood, Doctor Foster or Genii and many more would be good but not evergreen.  You could underplant with spring bulbs to extend the season of interest.

    If you really want herbaceous perennials, penstemons would do well in the right compost and would have a long flowering period with several forms and colours available.   

    You could also try a rose such as this one https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/348085/Rosa-The-Ancient-Mariner-Ausoutcry-(S)/Details

    A lot depends on how large is your large pot, the kind of compost/planting medium you use and how often you are willing and able to water.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • @Obelixx. Thanks so much for that information.  So helpful.  I love the idea of hardy fuchsia’s or The ancient mariner rose. Evergreen isn’t a problem.   I haven’t bought the pots or compost yet so will look into both of those.  It’s very dry in the front garden and I don’t have any problem with slugs and snails ... unlike the back garden 🐌  🙄.   Thanks again! 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,551
    edited April 2021
    Believe me, if you add watered pots the slimesters will find them.  They do here!

    Remember also that composts only have enough feed to last about 90 days so you need to top dress every spring with a generous dollop of slow release fertiliser and include a liquid feed once a week thru the growing season and up to mid July.  Feeding later than that may lead to soft growth that doesn't have time to harden off before winter frosts.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Obelixx said:
    Believe me, if you add watered pots the slimesters will find them.  They do here!

    Remember also that composts only have enough feed to last about 90 days so you need to top dress every spring with a generous dollop of slow release fertiliser and include a liquid feed once a week thru the growing season and up to mid July.  Feeding later than that may lead to soft growth that doesn't have time to harden off before winter frosts.
    I must admit I’ve changed my back garden over the years to lavenders, nepeta, salvia and roses as the slugs were obliterating everything in sight.  Annuals are a no-no.  I’ll take on board what you’ve said Obelixx and I think I’ll go for the hardy fuchsias.  I’ve always like the look of one called ‘Hawkshead’ which would light up the area when the sun’s gone.  Would that work do you think?? 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,551
    Yes but don't let it get thirsty and be sure to take cuttings in case you get a hard winter and lose the main plants.  Use a winter mulch to protect the crown against heavy frosts.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/87155/fuchsia-hawkshead-/Details 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Obelixx said:
    Yes but don't let it get thirsty and be sure to take cuttings in case you get a hard winter and lose the main plants.  Use a winter mulch to protect the crown against heavy frosts.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/87155/fuchsia-hawkshead-/Details 
    Thanks so much!!  
  • DedekindDedekind Posts: 171
    Obelixx said:
    Believe me, if you add watered pots the slimesters will find them.  They do here!

    Remember also that composts only have enough feed to last about 90 days so you need to top dress every spring with a generous dollop of slow release fertiliser and include a liquid feed once a week thru the growing season and up to mid July.  Feeding later than that may lead to soft growth that doesn't have time to harden off before winter frosts.
    So both slow release fertiliser AND liquid feed? I thought that would be too much. What I did this year was just top dress a bit with MP compost and then I liquid feed. But I am a complete novice! :):smile:
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,551
    MP compost is not a fertiliser.  It's a growing medium with a bit of fertiliser in it but not much.

    Slow release fertilisers have a balanced feed or one specially formulated for flowers and fruits, depending on what you use, and release their nutrients slowly over 2 or 3 months.  Liquid feeds are instantly available and a good tonic and are also formulated to be high in nitrogen for foliage, balanced NPK for general plant care or high in P and K for flowering and fruiting plants.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • DedekindDedekind Posts: 171
    Obelixx said:
    MP compost is not a fertiliser.  It's a growing medium with a bit of fertiliser in it but not much.

    Slow release fertilisers have a balanced feed or one specially formulated for flowers and fruits, depending on what you use, and release their nutrients slowly over 2 or 3 months.  Liquid feeds are instantly available and a good tonic and are also formulated to be high in nitrogen for foliage, balanced NPK for general plant care or high in P and K for flowering and fruiting plants.
    I see! So I guess liquid feed alone is probably not enough then 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,551
    It can be if you do it enough but the slow release is a good back up for when you forget the liquid feed.   Cheaper too.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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