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I could use a few 'deep' pots.(pic).

young codgeryoung codger Posts: 448
edited April 2021 in Tools and techniques

The pot in the photo is a 3LT size. I think this deep shape is referred to as a rose pot. I could do with about half a dozen or so.

I occasionally find rooted trees growing in the garden. By the time I see them, they have a root that is much longer than a standard shaped pot could accommodate.

The tree now growing in the pot was discovered only yesterday. I had to bend the last 5" of the root at a right angle, even to get it in this deep pot but it was fine.

I don't mind used pots, and I've looked on e bay, but nothing yet. I welcome suggestions


Posts

  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 3,622
    This company is local to me and provides excellent value for money

    https://www.theplantman.net/new-page-2#!/Commercial-Pots/c/64254244

    Though they provide a delivery service it might be through their own vans so would only work for you if you lived near Market Harborough.
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,008
    That's a horse chestnut - is your garden big enough for one?
    I've got one, grown from a conker, it's got a few years under its belt now and is promising to be a lovely tree, but it's planted well away from the house, near the neighbouring field boundary and I have several acres to choose from. Though quite a bit of it is bog...
  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 3,622
    This company sells rose pots. They have an eBay site as well.

    https://elixirgardensupplies.co.uk/
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    That's where I get mine @BenCotto 👍
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • AthelasAthelas Posts: 573
    Many garden centres have a large bin where customers drop in used pots. Obviously you can buy rose pots as above, but maybe have a rummage if you have a garden centre nearby
  • StephenSouthwestStephenSouthwest Southwest EnglandPosts: 334
    I tend to keep random young trees in compost bags till such time as I find the place to put them in the ground...
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,904
    What about florist buckets?  
    Utah, USA.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,955
    I’ve got several of those flower buckets, from Morrison,  they tape them together and sell for a pound,  not sure they’re doing that through this COVID malarkey but worth an ask if you’re in a SM that sell flowers. 
    Very good for tomatoes if you haven’t got room to plant them out as you can drop them in very deep. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,422
    That's a horse chestnut - is your garden big enough for one?
    I've got one, grown from a conker, it's got a few years under its belt now and is promising to be a lovely tree, but it's planted well away from the house, near the neighbouring field boundary and I have several acres to choose from. Though quite a bit of it is bog...

    You can always grow a Horse Chestnut as a bonsai.
    Can be a challenge as the leaves are naturally large and take a few years to get them smaller.
    Here is one (not mine!) which is 58 years old and been 'in training' for 10 years.




    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
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