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Pond Plants

brackenbracken South West EnglandPosts: 91
Have just put in a new pond for wildlife.  Started buying proper pond plants, water lilies, marginals and oxygenators which are all quite expensive.  Has anyone any experience of ordinary garden plants that might be OK for shallow parts.  I've already got some mind your own business and creeping jenny that I'm going to transplant around the edges.

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  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,297
    Depends where you live ! Marsh marigold and yellow flag iris grow wild here and some of the Astilbe I planted years ago now do too. Anything that likes moist soil grows like fun and means I am constantly having to dig up and remove the more enthusiastic ones.
    But then, much of my garden is very wet for much of the year, and some parts are actually bog..
    The lesson is though, that if you provide the right conditions, and have just a little patience, your marginals and oxygenators will soon multiply, so you only need to buy one of each. Even holds for waterlilies, though they are slower if they are fancy hybrids, but the wild white ones can take over a lake, given the chance. :)
  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 2,443
    If you have bought marginal plants, they will do for "shallow" parts.  As above, be a bit wary of how many plants you put in the pond - if they are suitable, they will be happy to spread after a couple of years.
    Bog gardens are a little different if that is what you meant - depending on your location and pond site, there are a lot of plants to choose from. 
  • I started my little pond off with 3 oxygenator plants. I now each year remove 3 buckets full of the wretched thing twice a year it is so rampant.
    There are miniature waterlilies which are lovely and some cultivated varieties of iris can be grown in pots as marginals.Also marsh marigolds make a lovely splash of colour in the pond margin.
  • brackenbracken South West EnglandPosts: 91
    Many thanks for the suggestions.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,320
    squireler said:
    I've already got some mind your own business and creeping jenny that I'm going to transplant around the edges.
    I'd not have either , anywhere in my garden. Both totally invasive. Beware
    Devon.
  • brackenbracken South West EnglandPosts: 91
    Yes they can be invasive but grown both for many years.  When they get too out of hand I dig pieces out to keep them more contained.  
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,744
    Sedges like Carex can be grown in the garden, or as an aquatic marginal.  Some Lobelia's too.
  • brackenbracken South West EnglandPosts: 91
    Sedges like Carex can be grown in the garden, or as an aquatic marginal.  Some Lobelia's too.

    Oh thanks for that I have lots of different Sedges so will give that a try.   Lobelia Cardinalis is good and grows well in shallow water.

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