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Shrub ID please

Anna33Anna33 West SussexPosts: 285
Final one from me for the time being.

It's about 4ft high at the moment, very dense. Some leaves right at the bottom are variegated, but the rest of the plant has all-green leaves, which suggests that they have out-competed the variegated ones.

My plant app identified this as a type of Euonymus - possibly Euonymus japnonica, but looking them up, there are loads of varieties of this. I can't identify which one it is, or whether it's something else entirely. 

Can anyone help ID this for certain?






(bit blurry, sorry)


Posts

  • Anna33Anna33 West SussexPosts: 285
    I'd also like to know how big this is going to get - it's going to be moved, but I need to know where to move it to...!
  • PianoplayerPianoplayer Posts: 585
    Hi - definitely Euonymus. I think I can see some variegated bits at the bottom, so I wonder if it was originally Emerald Gaiety or Silver Queen that has reverted to non-variegated?

    They get to be about 1m, but I think can be clipped quite hard.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,667
    edited April 2021
    Euonymus yes.
    But leaves are wrong shape for Euonymus fortunei Emerald Gaity or
    Euonymus fortunei Silver Queen....
    see my pics below

    Would suggest it is Euonymus japonicus microphylla...with narrower pointed leaves...see link

    https://www.cfgphoto.com/photo-79692.htm

    1 and 2.     Silver Queen.
    3.4 and 5. Emerald Gaity.




    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • pickle61pickle61 Posts: 43
    looking at the thin variegated leaves, it could be euonymus pierrolino.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,667
    edited April 2021
    pickle61 said:
    looking at the thin variegated leaves, it could be euonymus pierrolino.
    Interesting suggestion.
    I disagree ...but see what others think.


    "Pierrolino® is a novelty of Japanese spindle from the Netherlands, patented in 2003. It was found by Andianus van Heesben as a naturally occurring mutation among other Japanese spindles. It is a slow growing, low shrub with leaves that emerge almost white, changing to white-mottled later and turning dark green at the bottom of the shrub when mature."
    https://www.google.com/search?q="euonymus+japonicus+pierrolino"&client=firefox-b-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiJhPHt-IfwAhXRXRUIHfneB7sQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1280&bih=579




    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • TackTack Central South UKPosts: 880
    edited April 2021
    Have a look for images of Euonymus japonicus 'Jean Hugues', it looks a lot like mine on top.  EUONYMUS JEAN HUGUES Euonymus japonicus Jean Hugues Hedging Plants  Trees Shrubs and ConifersThe growth habit looks similar too but the variegation doesn't make sense but maybe the experts know if there is a variegated close relative.


  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,667
    Tack said:
    Have a look for images of Euonymus japonicus 'Jean Hugues', it looks a lot like mine on top.  The growth habit looks similar too but the variegation doesn't make sense but maybe the experts know if there is a variegated close relative.


    Euonymus japonicus 'Jean Hugues'....Yes....looks a good one for matching leaf shape.

    The plant obviously started out with variegated leaves, it has since reverted to plain green.

    There are now so many named cultivars of these dwarf Euonymus it is getting a bit ridiculous to tell one from another.  No matter...we are all agreed it is a Euonymus!

    https://www.google.com/search?q="euonymus+japonicus+'jean+hugues'&client=firefox-b-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwic_6zHiojwAhX7QhUIHQWOAiMQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1280&bih=579
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Anna33Anna33 West SussexPosts: 285
    Thank you all - it does look quite like Jean Hugues. I'm normally not too bothered by Euonymus as a species, and have a huge one elsewhere in the garden that is only being saved by the fact that a lot of bees/flying insects seem to enjoy swarming in and around it.

    This one, however, is a really nice one, so it's good to get an ID. And I much prefer the all-green leaves to the variegated ones, looks much nicer (classier?).
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