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Tree advice :)

Hey, 

I am after a tree for my garden and just wanted to get some advise on what to go for as there is a lot of choice. 

My garden is about 6x6 meters so I don't want something that's going to grow huge but it needs to be big enough to provide some privacy over fence.

Thanks
Luke
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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,544
    General location, aspect and soil type?  All these affect what will do well.

    Have a read of this - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=117 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 2,507
    As you say a lot of choice if they were all in stock!
    You haven't said about sun levels and soil.
    Crab apples , amelanchier and Rowan all have a lot of interest during the year.
    have a look at https://www.mailordertrees.co.uk/  as they have a good seach filter for size, shape etc.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,544
    Should add that the best time to plant trees is autumn when they are dormant so the roots have time to get established before the big energy surge needed in spring.   If you plant one now it will need thorough soil preparation and watering all thru the growing season.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Also keep in mind trees don't have to necessarily be tree shaped. You can lift and thin the crown (quite a lot on some) to give more light underneath or you can train them as espaliers, fans etc.
  • Thanks for the comments, I will hold off until autumn then. Ive had some bad experience with a crabapple tree so I will say I'm not after a fruit tree however I would prefer something that's native and good for local wildlife. I'm not sure what the soil type is and my garden does get a fair bit of light. Picture below.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 4,136
    A native UK tree good for wildlife...
    I would suggest /recommend  Sorbus.....common name rowan. 
    Doesn't get too big. Easy.
    Not a foreign one but the simple UK native one Sorbus aucuparia.
     White flowers in spring/red berries in the autumn.
    The birds will eat the berries.

    https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/trees-woods-and-wildlife/british-trees/a-z-of-british-trees/rowan/



    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Greater ManchesterPosts: 834
    I was also going to suggest Rowan, or Hawthorn, both great for birds and insects and attractive. 

    Any tree will take a while to get to the size where it will provide a decent amount of privacy though.  
  • I agree a Sorbus is an excellent way to go with your preferences. For a form which is also native, provides berries and would contrast with your softer-looking shrub to the right, how about Sorbus aria 'Lutescens'? Alternatively, there are some gorgeous haws, such as Crataegus persimilis 'Prunifolia' or Crataeagus tanacetifolia.

    Last of all, to screen off that house on the left, you could simply plant another large shrub: Viburnum lantana is a native species that would do the trick. There's a yellow-leafed form called 'Aureum', but that may be more slow-growing. Or you could use an elder: check out Sambucus nigra 'Eva', for example.

    None of these are evergreen, so if you wanted year-round cover you might have to opt for a holly or a non-native such as Cotoneaster 'Cornubia'.
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Greater ManchesterPosts: 834
    A viburnum tinus is a good evergreen that local wildlife will enjoy, fast growing too in my experience!
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,094
    We love our multistemmed amelanchier ... planted it 5 years ago ... as it’s multistemmed if it gets too large you can just take one of the taller stems out at the base, but can’t see us needing to do that for a good while if ever. 
    Wonderful blossom, the blackbirds love the fruit and the autumn colour is glorious. This is ours this morning 

    and last autumn

    😊 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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