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Bluebells and other "grass-like" plant leaves

NorthernJoeNorthernJoe Posts: 656
OK plant amnesia means I lost most of my plant ID skills of my youth. I can ID Ransomes from just the leaf because of where they're growing, leaf shape and smell. Plus I've been picking them for eating purposes for a few years now. Bluebells I recognize now only by the flower bud or full flower. Unfortunately we've not got many flowers out. We've got so many of these kinds of leaf shape in our garden from daffodils through, tulips, bluebells, Ransomes to a few I have no idea about. Wider leaf and a little glossy I think at least. Most I suspect are bluebells or snowdrops. I think they're thinner and more alike than the others.

My question is about whether I'm damaging them and reducing their success next year if I end up pulling a few leaves out when clearing the debris and dead plant stalks among them? To get a lot done with the tidying up I'm being more than a little brusque and impatient with my tidying. Unfortunately so far it's left a few bruised leaves and a lot of leaves gets removed with the detritus.

Should I take care or just get the job done and accept I might get a poor showing next year or this in some cases? There's enough in the garden to transplant if needed. Plus plenty in the paths we're taking out as we go anyway.

We moved in early march, I've not really seen any bluebells, is it too early? When are the snowdrops?

Posts

  • Butterfly66Butterfly66 BirminghamPosts: 736
    Snowdrops will have flowered in February/March so will just be leaves now. Their leaves tend to be a greyish blue and fairly narrow.
    pits a little early for bluebells, some of ours have flowers just beginning to show some colour but lots haven’t as yet. They are more green than snowdrops and slightly glossier. I wouldn’t worry too much, if you’re pulling up some leaves. In my experience bluebells are pretty robust (English and Spanish equally), it’s hard to get rid of them. You might get a few less flowers on some next year but they’ll soon recover.
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 2,507
    edited April 2021
    Never heard of Ransomes, must look it up. Edit looked up and came up with lawn mowers!
    Snowdrop flowers are gone but the leaves are there and you might see a stem with a green seed pod.
    Muscari are still flowering.
    Crocus tend to have a stripe.
    Bluebells are out or they were the other week.
    If you post some photos there are some folk on here that excel in plant recognition. 
    If your leaves are bluebells they never seem to be bothered. 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,347
    edited April 2021
    K67 said:
    Never heard of Ransomes, must look it up. Edit looked up and came up with lawn mowers!

    Think we’re talking about Ramsons ... wild garlic ... allium ursinum 😃 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 2,507
    Thank you @Dovefromabove mystery solved and something new learned
  • NorthernJoeNorthernJoe Posts: 656
    K67 said:
    Never heard of Ransomes, must look it up. Edit looked up and came up with lawn mowers!

    Think we’re talking about Ramsons ... wild garlic ... allium ursinum 😃 

    Yes, I meant them. I kind of get the author of swallows and Amazon's mixed with wild garlic. I got them mixed once and realised the mistake so now when I want to say ramsons I think that's wrong so correct myself to the wrong name. You know what I mean? There's a term describing that thought process that makes mistakes like that.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,347
    I think I recognise that thought process @NorthernJoe  🙄 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,568
    Spoonerism?

    I brought some ransoms from my Belgian garden but they haven't survived but I have just found a website that offers "unusual" edible plants and have ordered some seeds.   I know the garden and its soil mixes and so on a bit better now so fingers crossed.

    Proper bluebells grow in the hedgerows here so I'm hoping the ones I planted here a couple of years go will do well but they're being shy.  On the other hand, we've just had to pull up yet another batch of persistent Spanish bluebells but not as many as last year.  Constant vigilance.


    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,878
    My Spanish bluebells are almost out but no sign of the English, they’re much later. Never out until May. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • didywdidyw East SuffolkPosts: 1,706
    Spanish bluebells were a real pest in the the front garden of my previous house. I was relieved there were none here, when we moved nearly 20 years ago.  Until yesterday when I noticed some growing on my side of next door's beech hedge and more under the hedge and into her side.  Right - you're coming out I said and attacked with a spade. Dug up 4 but only one with a bulb. Dammit!
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