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Star Jasmine Problem

I've recently purchased 2 x Star Jasmine plants that are each about 1 metre high.  I planted them in the ground either side of an arch.  I noticed this morning that one of the plants has a number of discoloured leaves, the other looks fine.  Can anyone advise what this is and the best solution to resolve?  Thanks

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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 6,527
    I think you can blame the weather for that.
    They'll soon recover as it warms up a bit.
    They're not completely hardy in all parts of the UK, but yours looks fine.
    The leaves often turn a dark red in cold weather, but return to green in the Spring when it warms up
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • welshcakewelshcake Posts: 66
    Brilliant - thanks Pete, that's really good to know.  
  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,500
    Hi @welshcake can you recommend your source?  I’m just about to buy a couple for an arch 
  • AstroAstro Posts: 309
    I found with my SJ that they drop the leaves from last year and put on new ones late spring/early summer.
  • welshcakewelshcake Posts: 66
    JoeX said:
    Hi @welshcake can you recommend your source?  I’m just about to buy a couple for an arch 
    Yes, I'm happy to recommend them - they came from Hedges Direct. Just checked the invoice and they are actually 2 metres high (not 1 metre as I said in my post).  I paid £30 each for them and there was no delivery charge because my order value was high enough - I had 3 x 6 year old cherry laurels as well as some other plants.  I think the delivery was about 2 weeks from order but they are quite clear about delivery times on their website.  I also called them a few times for advice when planting the laurels and they were really helpful
  • welshcakewelshcake Posts: 66
    Astro said:
    I found with my SJ that they drop the leaves from last year and put on new ones late spring/early summer.
    Thanks Astro, that's good to know too.  I actually have a star jasmine elsewhere in the garden but I've only recently got into gardening so am sorry to say that I've never really noticed what happens with it.  Now I've opened my eyes to the garden a bit more, I'm noticing loads of stuff lol.  I don't think the other jasmine has flowered at all (unless I was really blinkered!) so I put some blood, fish and bone around it the other day and have got some liquid feed to give it regularly for the next 4-5 months.....fingers crossed!  
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 10,409
    I would remove the old leaves with brown spots on, just in case they have a fungal infection or pests to prevent possible tranfer to the new leaves which will grow.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • welshcakewelshcake Posts: 66
    I would remove the old leaves with brown spots on, just in case they have a fungal infection or pests to prevent possible tranfer to the new leaves which will grow.
    Thanks for that advice Bob.  When I Googled the problem before doing this post, it did sound like there was a possibility of a fungal problem.  I'll remove the leaves as you've suggested and keep an eye on whether any further leaves get affected
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 24,318
    I have 2 of these and both have changed leaf colour in response to the cold this winter, going a deep red but they don't seem to have any other problems so far.  I have given them their spring feed and also watered as it's been so very dry here the last couple of weeks but with strong, desiccating winds.

    I think you should change the way you are training it.  Those metal loops will end up being too tight and will likely strangle the stems.  Better to use loosely tied twine to attach the stems to those metal oops.   Better also, for flowering, to wind the stems around and up the supports so they are lying more diagonally than vertically.   This will also encourage extra shoots with more flowers.

    Feed it every spring with some blood, fish and bone loosely forked in around the roots or some tomato fertiliser granules as they will help promote healthy foliage and flowers.  Give it occasional liquid tonics of tomato feed diluted according to the instructions or you could make your own comfrey tea as that's excellent for flowering plants too - and tomatoes.  Don't feed after mid July as new growth after that won't have time to mature and harden before winter comes again.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • welshcakewelshcake Posts: 66
    Obelixx said:
    I have 2 of these and both have changed leaf colour in response to the cold this winter, going a deep red but they don't seem to have any other problems so far.  I have given them their spring feed and also watered as it's been so very dry here the last couple of weeks but with strong, desiccating winds.

    I think you should change the way you are training it.  Those metal loops will end up being too tight and will likely strangle the stems.  Better to use loosely tied twine to attach the stems to those metal oops.   Better also, for flowering, to wind the stems around and up the supports so they are lying more diagonally than vertically.   This will also encourage extra shoots with more flowers.

    Feed it every spring with some blood, fish and bone loosely forked in around the roots or some tomato fertiliser granules as they will help promote healthy foliage and flowers.  Give it occasional liquid tonics of tomato feed diluted according to the instructions or you could make your own comfrey tea as that's excellent for flowering plants too - and tomatoes.  Don't feed after mid July as new growth after that won't have time to mature and harden before winter comes again.
    Thanks Obelixx.  I have another star jasmine elsewhere in the garden where the leaves go red in the winter which is what I understand often happens with them.  On this one, the leaves have gone more of a brown/orange.  I followed the advice on a previous post from Bob and removed all the damaged leaves in case it's a fungal problem.  The ones that were fully brown, just fell away as soon as I touched them. 

    I do have the jasmine loosely tied with twine.  I think it's the angle of the photo - I was concentrating on getting pictures of leaves and I can see why it looks like there are metal hoops.  It's being trained up a wooden moon circle but is definitely more vertical than diagonal so I'll have a look at reorganising it on the weekend as I'd really like to have more shoots and plenty of flowers.  Thanks for the tips on the feeding too.
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