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Is it possible to divide heather?

autumngloryautumnglory Posts: 255
Hi all, hope you're all enjoying the sunny Easter weather!

I have this heather in my garden, it's erica x darleyensis 'Tweety'. It's looking a bit sad in the middle now but it's one of my favourite plants for the bright colours. I was wondering if it would be possible to divide it into two new plants?

I really don't want to lose it so if not what is the best way of propagating some new ones? Are heathers difficult to root from cuttings?



Posts

  • CeresCeres Posts: 2,126
    Erica is a shrub with a woody stem. It isn't possible to chop it into two separate plants as you would with an iris for instance. You can take semi-hardwood cuttings later in the year. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=404

  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,452
    If there are any branches which have formed their own roots, for example if they were accidentally buried, you can remove and pot on individually. But I don't think you can divide a heather.
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 3,995
    I think layering would be your best bet.
    Spread some nice soft ericaceous mix under the plant, then peg down suitable low lying stems with little wire U shapes and hope that they grow roots as @Loxley has suggested. They might need some water in very dry weather for encouragement.
    It won't be terribly fast, but eventually you may see signs of new growth on the ends and will be able to separate off new little plants.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,518
    There is one method..
    If you remove the whole plant then dig a much deeper hole so that when you put the plant back in the hole just the top 3-4" of the plant is above ground, then refill with soil.
    After about a year many of the stems will have started to produce their own roots and you can either leave it or cut some off and plant elsewhere.
    I tried it a LONG time ago and it did work.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,356
    There is one method.
    If you remove the whole plant then dig a much deeper hole so that when you put the plant back in the hole just the top 3-4" of the plant is above ground, then refill with soil.
    After about a year many of the stems will have started to produce their own roots and you can either leave it or cut some off and plant elsewhere.
    I tried it a LONG time ago and it did work.
    I agree ... I saw it demonstrated on GW years ago ... possibly by Geoff Hamilton, or even Percy Thrower ... it works, I did it with some of my parent's elderly heathers.
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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